Protective effect of dried safflower petal aqueous extract and its main constituent, carthamus yellow, against lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in RAW264.7 macrophages

Ching Chiung Wang, Cheuk-Sing Choy, Yung Hung Liu, Khoot Peng Cheah, Joe Sharg Li, Jimmy Tse Jen Wang, Wen Yu Yu, Che-Wei Lin, Hui Wen Cheng, Chien-Ming Hu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Safflower, whose botanic name is Carthamus tinctorius L., is a member of the family Compositae or Asteraceae. Carthamus yellow (CY) is the main constituent of safflower and is composed of safflomin A and safflomin B. Dried safflower petals are used in folk medicine and have been shown to invigorate blood circulation, break up blood stasis, and promote menstruation. In addition, dried safflower petals contain yellow dyes that are used to color food and cosmetics. In this study, we investigated the effects of dried safflower petals aqueous extracts (SFA) and CY on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation using RAW264.7 macrophages.RESULTS: Our data showed that treatment with SFA (1-1000 μg mL-1) and CY (1-2000 μg mL-1) does not cause cytotoxicity in cells. SFA and CY inhibited LPS-stimulated nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and interleukin 17 (IL-1β) release, through attenuation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression. Further, SFA and CY suppressed the LPS-induced phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB, which was associated with the inhibition of IκB-α degradation.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that SFA and CY provide an anti-inflammatory response through inhibiting the production of NO and PGE2 by the downregulation of iNOS and COX-2 gene expression. Thus safflower petals have the potential to provide a therapeutic approach to inflammation-associated disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)218-225
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
Volume91
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 30 2011

Fingerprint

Carthamus
Carthamus tinctorius
lipopolysaccharides
corolla
protective effect
Lipopolysaccharides
macrophages
inflammation
Macrophages
Inflammation
extracts
water
Asteraceae
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II
prostaglandin synthase
Cyclooxygenase 2
Dinoprostone
prostaglandins
nitric oxide
Nitric Oxide

Keywords

  • Carthamus tinctorius L.
  • Carthamus yellow
  • Cyclooxygenase-2
  • Inducible nitric oxide synthase
  • Lipopolysaccharide
  • Safflower

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Biotechnology

Cite this

Protective effect of dried safflower petal aqueous extract and its main constituent, carthamus yellow, against lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in RAW264.7 macrophages. / Wang, Ching Chiung; Choy, Cheuk-Sing; Liu, Yung Hung; Cheah, Khoot Peng; Li, Joe Sharg; Wang, Jimmy Tse Jen; Yu, Wen Yu; Lin, Che-Wei; Cheng, Hui Wen; Hu, Chien-Ming.

In: Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, Vol. 91, No. 2, 30.01.2011, p. 218-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Safflower, whose botanic name is Carthamus tinctorius L., is a member of the family Compositae or Asteraceae. Carthamus yellow (CY) is the main constituent of safflower and is composed of safflomin A and safflomin B. Dried safflower petals are used in folk medicine and have been shown to invigorate blood circulation, break up blood stasis, and promote menstruation. In addition, dried safflower petals contain yellow dyes that are used to color food and cosmetics. In this study, we investigated the effects of dried safflower petals aqueous extracts (SFA) and CY on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation using RAW264.7 macrophages.RESULTS: Our data showed that treatment with SFA (1-1000 μg mL-1) and CY (1-2000 μg mL-1) does not cause cytotoxicity in cells. SFA and CY inhibited LPS-stimulated nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and interleukin 17 (IL-1β) release, through attenuation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression. Further, SFA and CY suppressed the LPS-induced phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB, which was associated with the inhibition of IκB-α degradation.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that SFA and CY provide an anti-inflammatory response through inhibiting the production of NO and PGE2 by the downregulation of iNOS and COX-2 gene expression. Thus safflower petals have the potential to provide a therapeutic approach to inflammation-associated disorders.",
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AU - Choy, Cheuk-Sing

AU - Liu, Yung Hung

AU - Cheah, Khoot Peng

AU - Li, Joe Sharg

AU - Wang, Jimmy Tse Jen

AU - Yu, Wen Yu

AU - Lin, Che-Wei

AU - Cheng, Hui Wen

AU - Hu, Chien-Ming

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N2 - Background: Safflower, whose botanic name is Carthamus tinctorius L., is a member of the family Compositae or Asteraceae. Carthamus yellow (CY) is the main constituent of safflower and is composed of safflomin A and safflomin B. Dried safflower petals are used in folk medicine and have been shown to invigorate blood circulation, break up blood stasis, and promote menstruation. In addition, dried safflower petals contain yellow dyes that are used to color food and cosmetics. In this study, we investigated the effects of dried safflower petals aqueous extracts (SFA) and CY on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation using RAW264.7 macrophages.RESULTS: Our data showed that treatment with SFA (1-1000 μg mL-1) and CY (1-2000 μg mL-1) does not cause cytotoxicity in cells. SFA and CY inhibited LPS-stimulated nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and interleukin 17 (IL-1β) release, through attenuation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression. Further, SFA and CY suppressed the LPS-induced phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB, which was associated with the inhibition of IκB-α degradation.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that SFA and CY provide an anti-inflammatory response through inhibiting the production of NO and PGE2 by the downregulation of iNOS and COX-2 gene expression. Thus safflower petals have the potential to provide a therapeutic approach to inflammation-associated disorders.

AB - Background: Safflower, whose botanic name is Carthamus tinctorius L., is a member of the family Compositae or Asteraceae. Carthamus yellow (CY) is the main constituent of safflower and is composed of safflomin A and safflomin B. Dried safflower petals are used in folk medicine and have been shown to invigorate blood circulation, break up blood stasis, and promote menstruation. In addition, dried safflower petals contain yellow dyes that are used to color food and cosmetics. In this study, we investigated the effects of dried safflower petals aqueous extracts (SFA) and CY on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation using RAW264.7 macrophages.RESULTS: Our data showed that treatment with SFA (1-1000 μg mL-1) and CY (1-2000 μg mL-1) does not cause cytotoxicity in cells. SFA and CY inhibited LPS-stimulated nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and interleukin 17 (IL-1β) release, through attenuation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression. Further, SFA and CY suppressed the LPS-induced phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB, which was associated with the inhibition of IκB-α degradation.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that SFA and CY provide an anti-inflammatory response through inhibiting the production of NO and PGE2 by the downregulation of iNOS and COX-2 gene expression. Thus safflower petals have the potential to provide a therapeutic approach to inflammation-associated disorders.

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