Prostate cancer mortality-to-incidence ratios are associated with cancer care disparities in 35 countries

Sung Lang Chen, Shao Chuan Wang, Cheng Ju Ho, Yu Lin Kao, Tzuo Yi Hsieh, Wen Jung Chen, Chih Jung Chen, Pei Ru Wu, Jiunn Liang Ko, Huei Lee, Wen Wei Sung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The variation in mortality-to-incidence ratios (MIRs) among countries reflects the clinical outcomes and the available interventions for colorectal cancer treatments. The association between MIR of prostate cancer and cancer care disparities among countries is an interesting issue that is rarely investigated. For the present study, cancer incidence and mortality rates were obtained from the GLOBOCAN 2012 database. The rankings and total expenditures on health of various countries were obtained from the World Health Organization (WHO). The association between variables was analyzed by linear regression analyses. In this study, we estimated the role of MIRs from 35 countries that had a prostate cancer incidence greater than 5,000 cases per year. As expected, high prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates were observed in more developed regions, such as Europe and the Americas. However, the MIRs were 2.5 times higher in the less developed regions. Regarding the association between MIR and cancer care disparities, countries with good WHO ranking and high total expenditures on health/gross domestic product (GDP) were significant correlated with low MIR. The MIR variation for prostate cancer correlates with cancer care disparities among countries further support the role of cancer care disparities in clinical outcome.

Original languageEnglish
Article number40003
JournalScientific Reports
Volume7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 4 2017

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Prostatic Neoplasms
Mortality
Incidence
Neoplasms
Health Expenditures
Gross Domestic Product
Colorectal Neoplasms
Linear Models
Regression Analysis
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Chen, S. L., Wang, S. C., Ho, C. J., Kao, Y. L., Hsieh, T. Y., Chen, W. J., ... Sung, W. W. (2017). Prostate cancer mortality-to-incidence ratios are associated with cancer care disparities in 35 countries. Scientific Reports, 7, [40003]. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep40003

Prostate cancer mortality-to-incidence ratios are associated with cancer care disparities in 35 countries. / Chen, Sung Lang; Wang, Shao Chuan; Ho, Cheng Ju; Kao, Yu Lin; Hsieh, Tzuo Yi; Chen, Wen Jung; Chen, Chih Jung; Wu, Pei Ru; Ko, Jiunn Liang; Lee, Huei; Sung, Wen Wei.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, 40003, 04.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, SL, Wang, SC, Ho, CJ, Kao, YL, Hsieh, TY, Chen, WJ, Chen, CJ, Wu, PR, Ko, JL, Lee, H & Sung, WW 2017, 'Prostate cancer mortality-to-incidence ratios are associated with cancer care disparities in 35 countries', Scientific Reports, vol. 7, 40003. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep40003
Chen, Sung Lang ; Wang, Shao Chuan ; Ho, Cheng Ju ; Kao, Yu Lin ; Hsieh, Tzuo Yi ; Chen, Wen Jung ; Chen, Chih Jung ; Wu, Pei Ru ; Ko, Jiunn Liang ; Lee, Huei ; Sung, Wen Wei. / Prostate cancer mortality-to-incidence ratios are associated with cancer care disparities in 35 countries. In: Scientific Reports. 2017 ; Vol. 7.
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