Prevalence, distribution, and trends of workplace violence and its associated health problems: Findings from national surveys of taiwan

Yawen Cheng, Li Chung Pien

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Workplace violence is increasingly recognized as an important occupational health issue in Taiwan. This chapter provides an overview of the problem and policy debates concerning workplace violence in Taiwan, and presents empirical findings on its distributions, trends, antecedents, and associated health risks based on survey data of the general working population. Results showed that workplace violence in the forms of physical violence, verbal violence, psychological violence, and sexual harassment had increased markedly from 2010 to 2013. In general, women were more likely than men to experience workplace violence. In health care sectors, women had particularly higher prevalence rates of workplace violence than men, which may attribute to a greater gender inequality in health care settings. Results from multilevel analyses with adjustment of workers’ actual experiences of workplace violence showed that neighborhood-level workplace violence was positively associated with mental health risks in women but not in men. This finding suggested that working in an environment where aggressive or abusive behaviors are more prevalent may entail a greater mental health risk to women. Research improvement should be made in many aspects, ranging from the measures for workplace violence, study designs to investigate the casual mechanisms of workplace violence and health consequences, to the strategies for effective prevention. Furthermore, as the nature of workplace violence are embedded in social context, researchers, and occupational health practitioners should pay attention to contextual factors that might influence societal tolerance of abusive work practices and workers’ vulnerability to health impacts of workplace violence.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPsychosocial Factors at Work in the Asia Pacific
Subtitle of host publicationFrom Theory to Practice
PublisherSpringer International Publishing AG
Pages151-172
Number of pages22
ISBN (Electronic)9783319444000
ISBN (Print)9783319443997
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Workplace Violence
Taiwan
workplace
violence
Health
trend
health
health risk
Occupational Health
Violence
Mental Health
Surveys and Questionnaires
Workplace violence
Healthcare Disparities
Sexual Harassment
Social Adjustment
Multilevel Analysis
Health Care Sector
mental health
health care

Keywords

  • Gender
  • Mental health
  • Multi-level analysis
  • Survey
  • Workplace violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

Cite this

Cheng, Y., & Pien, L. C. (2016). Prevalence, distribution, and trends of workplace violence and its associated health problems: Findings from national surveys of taiwan. In Psychosocial Factors at Work in the Asia Pacific: From Theory to Practice (pp. 151-172). Springer International Publishing AG. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-44400-0_8

Prevalence, distribution, and trends of workplace violence and its associated health problems : Findings from national surveys of taiwan. / Cheng, Yawen; Pien, Li Chung.

Psychosocial Factors at Work in the Asia Pacific: From Theory to Practice. Springer International Publishing AG, 2016. p. 151-172.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Cheng, Y & Pien, LC 2016, Prevalence, distribution, and trends of workplace violence and its associated health problems: Findings from national surveys of taiwan. in Psychosocial Factors at Work in the Asia Pacific: From Theory to Practice. Springer International Publishing AG, pp. 151-172. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-44400-0_8
Cheng Y, Pien LC. Prevalence, distribution, and trends of workplace violence and its associated health problems: Findings from national surveys of taiwan. In Psychosocial Factors at Work in the Asia Pacific: From Theory to Practice. Springer International Publishing AG. 2016. p. 151-172 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-44400-0_8
Cheng, Yawen ; Pien, Li Chung. / Prevalence, distribution, and trends of workplace violence and its associated health problems : Findings from national surveys of taiwan. Psychosocial Factors at Work in the Asia Pacific: From Theory to Practice. Springer International Publishing AG, 2016. pp. 151-172
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