Preterm infants of educated mothers have better outcome

Lan Wan Wang, Shan Tair Wang, Chao Ching Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To determine the developmental trajectories of very-low-birthweight (VLBW) infants during the first 2 years of life, and investigate the most contributory predictors of diverse trajectories. Methods: This prospective cohort study enrolled 887 VLBW infants from January 1999 to December 2002 with regular follow-up at corrected age of 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Sociodemographic and medical data were collected, and the outcome measures consisted of neurological assessment and the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II. Results: Five trajectories of cognitive development based on the mental developmental indices from the age of 6 to 24 months were determined, including average-stable (group A, 20.1%), average-decline to borderline delay (group B, 34%), borderline delay-catch-up to average (group C, 20.2%), borderline delay-decline to significant delay (group D, 17.2%) and significant delay-stable (group E, 8.5%). Using group A as the reference category, we determined 6-month neurological status and maternal education as the most significant predictors for various trajectories (p <0.01). Infants with transient or definite neurological abnormality and/or low maternal education had higher odds of displaying the disadvantageous trajectories (group B, D and E; odds ratios, 1.79-46.4). Conclusion: VLBW infants with neurological abnormalities and/or low maternal education had high risk of developmental decline and might benefit from early intervention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)568-573
Number of pages6
JournalActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
Volume97
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Premature Infants
Mothers
Education
Child Development
Cohort Studies
Odds Ratio
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • Developmental trajectories
  • Early intervention
  • Maternal education
  • Neurological status
  • Very-low-birthweight infants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Preterm infants of educated mothers have better outcome. / Wang, Lan Wan; Wang, Shan Tair; Huang, Chao Ching.

In: Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics, Vol. 97, No. 5, 05.2008, p. 568-573.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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