Preconsultation use of analgesics on adults presenting to the emergency department with acute appendicitis

C. F. Chong, T. L. Wang, C. C. Chen, H. P. Ma, H. Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: 279 cases of appendicitis were reviewed and compared for the difference between those patients who received pain medication before consulting a surgeon and those who were not treated with analgesics. Methods: All patients aged 15 years and older who underwent appendicectomy for appendicitis between 1 July 2001 and 30 June 2002 were divided into group 1 (those who received preconsultaion use of analgesics) and group 2 (those who were not treated with analgesics). The following measures were compared: age, sex, symptom duration, initial vital signs, white blood cell counts, frequency of imaging studies, time to operative intervention, and operative findings. Continuous and categorical variables were analysed using t and χ2 tests, respectively. Results: A total of 279 patients were included for analysis. Patient details (age, sex, symptom duration) of the two study groups were similar. There was no statistically significant difference between group 1 and group 2 with respect to vital signs (systolic blood pressure, pulse rate, respiratory rate, body temperature), white blood cell counts, and frequency of imaging studies (ultrasound, computed tomography). There was no significant difference in the rate of perforated appendicitis between the two study groups although a shorter median time to operative intervention has been found in the group who received analegesia. Conclusion: The preconsultation use of analgesics in ED patients with a final diagnosis of appendicitis is not associated with a longer delay to operative intervention and is not associated with an increased rate of perforated appendicitis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-43
Number of pages3
JournalEmergency medicine journal : EMJ
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Appendicitis
Analgesics
Hospital Emergency Service
Vital Signs
Operative Time
Leukocyte Count
Blood Pressure
Respiratory Rate
Body Temperature
Ultrasonography
Heart Rate
Tomography
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Surgery
  • Nursing(all)
  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Preconsultation use of analgesics on adults presenting to the emergency department with acute appendicitis. / Chong, C. F.; Wang, T. L.; Chen, C. C.; Ma, H. P.; Chang, H.

In: Emergency medicine journal : EMJ, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.2004, p. 41-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{fc4d7458b68e45cb9f886d988b6e2511,
title = "Preconsultation use of analgesics on adults presenting to the emergency department with acute appendicitis",
abstract = "Objective: 279 cases of appendicitis were reviewed and compared for the difference between those patients who received pain medication before consulting a surgeon and those who were not treated with analgesics. Methods: All patients aged 15 years and older who underwent appendicectomy for appendicitis between 1 July 2001 and 30 June 2002 were divided into group 1 (those who received preconsultaion use of analgesics) and group 2 (those who were not treated with analgesics). The following measures were compared: age, sex, symptom duration, initial vital signs, white blood cell counts, frequency of imaging studies, time to operative intervention, and operative findings. Continuous and categorical variables were analysed using t and χ2 tests, respectively. Results: A total of 279 patients were included for analysis. Patient details (age, sex, symptom duration) of the two study groups were similar. There was no statistically significant difference between group 1 and group 2 with respect to vital signs (systolic blood pressure, pulse rate, respiratory rate, body temperature), white blood cell counts, and frequency of imaging studies (ultrasound, computed tomography). There was no significant difference in the rate of perforated appendicitis between the two study groups although a shorter median time to operative intervention has been found in the group who received analegesia. Conclusion: The preconsultation use of analgesics in ED patients with a final diagnosis of appendicitis is not associated with a longer delay to operative intervention and is not associated with an increased rate of perforated appendicitis.",
author = "Chong, {C. F.} and Wang, {T. L.} and Chen, {C. C.} and Ma, {H. P.} and H. Chang",
year = "2004",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1136/emj.2003.004853",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "41--43",
journal = "Emergency Medicine Journal",
issn = "1472-0205",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Preconsultation use of analgesics on adults presenting to the emergency department with acute appendicitis

AU - Chong, C. F.

AU - Wang, T. L.

AU - Chen, C. C.

AU - Ma, H. P.

AU - Chang, H.

PY - 2004/1

Y1 - 2004/1

N2 - Objective: 279 cases of appendicitis were reviewed and compared for the difference between those patients who received pain medication before consulting a surgeon and those who were not treated with analgesics. Methods: All patients aged 15 years and older who underwent appendicectomy for appendicitis between 1 July 2001 and 30 June 2002 were divided into group 1 (those who received preconsultaion use of analgesics) and group 2 (those who were not treated with analgesics). The following measures were compared: age, sex, symptom duration, initial vital signs, white blood cell counts, frequency of imaging studies, time to operative intervention, and operative findings. Continuous and categorical variables were analysed using t and χ2 tests, respectively. Results: A total of 279 patients were included for analysis. Patient details (age, sex, symptom duration) of the two study groups were similar. There was no statistically significant difference between group 1 and group 2 with respect to vital signs (systolic blood pressure, pulse rate, respiratory rate, body temperature), white blood cell counts, and frequency of imaging studies (ultrasound, computed tomography). There was no significant difference in the rate of perforated appendicitis between the two study groups although a shorter median time to operative intervention has been found in the group who received analegesia. Conclusion: The preconsultation use of analgesics in ED patients with a final diagnosis of appendicitis is not associated with a longer delay to operative intervention and is not associated with an increased rate of perforated appendicitis.

AB - Objective: 279 cases of appendicitis were reviewed and compared for the difference between those patients who received pain medication before consulting a surgeon and those who were not treated with analgesics. Methods: All patients aged 15 years and older who underwent appendicectomy for appendicitis between 1 July 2001 and 30 June 2002 were divided into group 1 (those who received preconsultaion use of analgesics) and group 2 (those who were not treated with analgesics). The following measures were compared: age, sex, symptom duration, initial vital signs, white blood cell counts, frequency of imaging studies, time to operative intervention, and operative findings. Continuous and categorical variables were analysed using t and χ2 tests, respectively. Results: A total of 279 patients were included for analysis. Patient details (age, sex, symptom duration) of the two study groups were similar. There was no statistically significant difference between group 1 and group 2 with respect to vital signs (systolic blood pressure, pulse rate, respiratory rate, body temperature), white blood cell counts, and frequency of imaging studies (ultrasound, computed tomography). There was no significant difference in the rate of perforated appendicitis between the two study groups although a shorter median time to operative intervention has been found in the group who received analegesia. Conclusion: The preconsultation use of analgesics in ED patients with a final diagnosis of appendicitis is not associated with a longer delay to operative intervention and is not associated with an increased rate of perforated appendicitis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0842308056&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0842308056&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/emj.2003.004853

DO - 10.1136/emj.2003.004853

M3 - Article

C2 - 14734373

AN - SCOPUS:0842308056

VL - 21

SP - 41

EP - 43

JO - Emergency Medicine Journal

JF - Emergency Medicine Journal

SN - 1472-0205

IS - 1

ER -