Postoperative showering for clean and clean-contaminated wounds. A prospective, randomized controlled trial

Pei Yin Hsieh, Kuen Yuan Chen, Hsuan Yu Chen, Wang Huei Sheng, Chin Hao Chang, Chiou Ling Wang, Pin Yi Chiag, Hsiao Ping Chen, Chin Wen Shiao, Po Chu Lee, Hao Chih Tai, Hsiung Fei Chien, Po Jui Yu, Been Ren Lin, Yeur Hur Lai, Jin Shing Chen, Hong Shiee Lai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate wound infection rates, pain scores, satisfaction with wound care, and wound care costs starting 48 hours after surgery. Background: Showering after surgery is a controversial issue for wound care providers and patients. We investigated the benefits and detriments of showering for postoperative wound care. Methods: Patients undergoing thyroid, lung, inguinal hernia, and face and extremity surgeries with clean or clean-contaminated wounds were included. The patients were randomized to allow showering (shower group) or to keep the wound dry (nonshower group) for postoperative wound care starting 48 hours after surgery. The primary endpoint was the rate of surgical wound infection. The secondary endpoints included the wound pain score, satisfaction with wound care, and cost of wound care. Results: Between May 2013 and March 2014, there were 222 patients randomized to the shower group and 222 to the nonshower group. Two patients in each group were lost to follow-up. There were 4 superficial surgical site infections in the shower group and 6 in the nonshower group (4/220, 1.8% vs 6/220, 2.7%, P=0.751). Postoperative pain scores were comparable between the 2 groups. Patients in the shower group were more satisfied with their method of wound care, and their wound care costs were lower when compared with the nonshower group. Conclusions: Clean and clean-contaminated wounds can be safely showered 48 hours after surgery. Postoperative showering does not increase the risk of surgical site complications. It may increase patients' satisfaction and lower the cost of wound care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)931-936
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Surgery
Volume263
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Randomized Controlled Trials
Wounds and Injuries
Surgical Wound Infection
Costs and Cost Analysis
Postoperative Care
Pain
Inguinal Hernia
Lost to Follow-Up
Wound Infection
Postoperative Pain
Patient Satisfaction
Patient Care
Thyroid Gland
Extremities
Lung

Keywords

  • Cost
  • Pain score
  • Shower
  • Wound care
  • Wound infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Hsieh, P. Y., Chen, K. Y., Chen, H. Y., Sheng, W. H., Chang, C. H., Wang, C. L., ... Lai, H. S. (2016). Postoperative showering for clean and clean-contaminated wounds. A prospective, randomized controlled trial. Annals of Surgery, 263(5), 931-936. https://doi.org/10.1097/SLA.0000000000001359

Postoperative showering for clean and clean-contaminated wounds. A prospective, randomized controlled trial. / Hsieh, Pei Yin; Chen, Kuen Yuan; Chen, Hsuan Yu; Sheng, Wang Huei; Chang, Chin Hao; Wang, Chiou Ling; Chiag, Pin Yi; Chen, Hsiao Ping; Shiao, Chin Wen; Lee, Po Chu; Tai, Hao Chih; Chien, Hsiung Fei; Yu, Po Jui; Lin, Been Ren; Lai, Yeur Hur; Chen, Jin Shing; Lai, Hong Shiee.

In: Annals of Surgery, Vol. 263, No. 5, 01.01.2016, p. 931-936.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hsieh, PY, Chen, KY, Chen, HY, Sheng, WH, Chang, CH, Wang, CL, Chiag, PY, Chen, HP, Shiao, CW, Lee, PC, Tai, HC, Chien, HF, Yu, PJ, Lin, BR, Lai, YH, Chen, JS & Lai, HS 2016, 'Postoperative showering for clean and clean-contaminated wounds. A prospective, randomized controlled trial', Annals of Surgery, vol. 263, no. 5, pp. 931-936. https://doi.org/10.1097/SLA.0000000000001359
Hsieh, Pei Yin ; Chen, Kuen Yuan ; Chen, Hsuan Yu ; Sheng, Wang Huei ; Chang, Chin Hao ; Wang, Chiou Ling ; Chiag, Pin Yi ; Chen, Hsiao Ping ; Shiao, Chin Wen ; Lee, Po Chu ; Tai, Hao Chih ; Chien, Hsiung Fei ; Yu, Po Jui ; Lin, Been Ren ; Lai, Yeur Hur ; Chen, Jin Shing ; Lai, Hong Shiee. / Postoperative showering for clean and clean-contaminated wounds. A prospective, randomized controlled trial. In: Annals of Surgery. 2016 ; Vol. 263, No. 5. pp. 931-936.
@article{6144b919f0d249c6a9b5f3165e06cf9b,
title = "Postoperative showering for clean and clean-contaminated wounds. A prospective, randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "Objective: To evaluate wound infection rates, pain scores, satisfaction with wound care, and wound care costs starting 48 hours after surgery. Background: Showering after surgery is a controversial issue for wound care providers and patients. We investigated the benefits and detriments of showering for postoperative wound care. Methods: Patients undergoing thyroid, lung, inguinal hernia, and face and extremity surgeries with clean or clean-contaminated wounds were included. The patients were randomized to allow showering (shower group) or to keep the wound dry (nonshower group) for postoperative wound care starting 48 hours after surgery. The primary endpoint was the rate of surgical wound infection. The secondary endpoints included the wound pain score, satisfaction with wound care, and cost of wound care. Results: Between May 2013 and March 2014, there were 222 patients randomized to the shower group and 222 to the nonshower group. Two patients in each group were lost to follow-up. There were 4 superficial surgical site infections in the shower group and 6 in the nonshower group (4/220, 1.8{\%} vs 6/220, 2.7{\%}, P=0.751). Postoperative pain scores were comparable between the 2 groups. Patients in the shower group were more satisfied with their method of wound care, and their wound care costs were lower when compared with the nonshower group. Conclusions: Clean and clean-contaminated wounds can be safely showered 48 hours after surgery. Postoperative showering does not increase the risk of surgical site complications. It may increase patients' satisfaction and lower the cost of wound care.",
keywords = "Cost, Pain score, Shower, Wound care, Wound infection",
author = "Hsieh, {Pei Yin} and Chen, {Kuen Yuan} and Chen, {Hsuan Yu} and Sheng, {Wang Huei} and Chang, {Chin Hao} and Wang, {Chiou Ling} and Chiag, {Pin Yi} and Chen, {Hsiao Ping} and Shiao, {Chin Wen} and Lee, {Po Chu} and Tai, {Hao Chih} and Chien, {Hsiung Fei} and Yu, {Po Jui} and Lin, {Been Ren} and Lai, {Yeur Hur} and Chen, {Jin Shing} and Lai, {Hong Shiee}",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/SLA.0000000000001359",
language = "English",
volume = "263",
pages = "931--936",
journal = "Annals of Surgery",
issn = "0003-4932",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Postoperative showering for clean and clean-contaminated wounds. A prospective, randomized controlled trial

AU - Hsieh, Pei Yin

AU - Chen, Kuen Yuan

AU - Chen, Hsuan Yu

AU - Sheng, Wang Huei

AU - Chang, Chin Hao

AU - Wang, Chiou Ling

AU - Chiag, Pin Yi

AU - Chen, Hsiao Ping

AU - Shiao, Chin Wen

AU - Lee, Po Chu

AU - Tai, Hao Chih

AU - Chien, Hsiung Fei

AU - Yu, Po Jui

AU - Lin, Been Ren

AU - Lai, Yeur Hur

AU - Chen, Jin Shing

AU - Lai, Hong Shiee

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Objective: To evaluate wound infection rates, pain scores, satisfaction with wound care, and wound care costs starting 48 hours after surgery. Background: Showering after surgery is a controversial issue for wound care providers and patients. We investigated the benefits and detriments of showering for postoperative wound care. Methods: Patients undergoing thyroid, lung, inguinal hernia, and face and extremity surgeries with clean or clean-contaminated wounds were included. The patients were randomized to allow showering (shower group) or to keep the wound dry (nonshower group) for postoperative wound care starting 48 hours after surgery. The primary endpoint was the rate of surgical wound infection. The secondary endpoints included the wound pain score, satisfaction with wound care, and cost of wound care. Results: Between May 2013 and March 2014, there were 222 patients randomized to the shower group and 222 to the nonshower group. Two patients in each group were lost to follow-up. There were 4 superficial surgical site infections in the shower group and 6 in the nonshower group (4/220, 1.8% vs 6/220, 2.7%, P=0.751). Postoperative pain scores were comparable between the 2 groups. Patients in the shower group were more satisfied with their method of wound care, and their wound care costs were lower when compared with the nonshower group. Conclusions: Clean and clean-contaminated wounds can be safely showered 48 hours after surgery. Postoperative showering does not increase the risk of surgical site complications. It may increase patients' satisfaction and lower the cost of wound care.

AB - Objective: To evaluate wound infection rates, pain scores, satisfaction with wound care, and wound care costs starting 48 hours after surgery. Background: Showering after surgery is a controversial issue for wound care providers and patients. We investigated the benefits and detriments of showering for postoperative wound care. Methods: Patients undergoing thyroid, lung, inguinal hernia, and face and extremity surgeries with clean or clean-contaminated wounds were included. The patients were randomized to allow showering (shower group) or to keep the wound dry (nonshower group) for postoperative wound care starting 48 hours after surgery. The primary endpoint was the rate of surgical wound infection. The secondary endpoints included the wound pain score, satisfaction with wound care, and cost of wound care. Results: Between May 2013 and March 2014, there were 222 patients randomized to the shower group and 222 to the nonshower group. Two patients in each group were lost to follow-up. There were 4 superficial surgical site infections in the shower group and 6 in the nonshower group (4/220, 1.8% vs 6/220, 2.7%, P=0.751). Postoperative pain scores were comparable between the 2 groups. Patients in the shower group were more satisfied with their method of wound care, and their wound care costs were lower when compared with the nonshower group. Conclusions: Clean and clean-contaminated wounds can be safely showered 48 hours after surgery. Postoperative showering does not increase the risk of surgical site complications. It may increase patients' satisfaction and lower the cost of wound care.

KW - Cost

KW - Pain score

KW - Shower

KW - Wound care

KW - Wound infection

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84949908292&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84949908292&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/SLA.0000000000001359

DO - 10.1097/SLA.0000000000001359

M3 - Article

C2 - 26655923

AN - SCOPUS:84949908292

VL - 263

SP - 931

EP - 936

JO - Annals of Surgery

JF - Annals of Surgery

SN - 0003-4932

IS - 5

ER -