Porphyromonas gingivalis GroEL induces osteoclastogenesis of periodontal ligament cells and enhances alveolar bone resorption in rats

Feng Yen Lin, Fung Ping Hsiao, Chun Yao Huang, Chun Ming Shih, Nai Wen Tsao, Chien Sung Tsai, Shue Fen Yang, Nen Chung Chang, Shan Ling Hung, Yi Wen Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major periodontal pathogen that contains a variety of virulence factors. The antibody titer to P. gingivalis GroEL, a homologue of HSP60, is significantly higher in periodontitis patients than in healthy control subjects, suggesting that P. gingivalis GroEL is a potential stimulator of periodontal disease. However, the specific role of GroEL in periodontal disease remains unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of P. gingivalis GroEL on human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells in vitro, as well as its effect on alveolar bone resorption in rats in vivo. First, we found that stimulation of PDL cells with recombinant GroEL increased the secretion of the bone resorption-associated cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8, potentially via NF-κB activation. Furthermore, GroEL could effectively stimulate PDL cell migration, possibly through activation of integrin α1 and α2 mRNA expression as well as cytoskeletal reorganization. Additionally, GroEL may be involved in osteoclastogenesis via receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL) activation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA inhibition in PDL cells. Finally, we inoculated GroEL into rat gingiva, and the results of microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and histomorphometric assays indicated that the administration of GroEL significantly increased inflammation and bone loss. In conclusion, P. gingivalis GroEL may act as a potent virulence factor, contributing to osteoclastogenesis of PDL cells and resulting in periodontal disease with alveolar bone resorption.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere102450
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 24 2014

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Porphyromonas gingivalis
Alveolar Bone Loss
Periodontal Ligament
bone resorption
Ligaments
ligaments
Bone Resorption
Osteogenesis
Rats
Bone
Periodontal Diseases
rats
Chemical activation
Virulence Factors
cells
virulence
gingiva
micro-computed tomography
Osteitis
X-Ray Microtomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Porphyromonas gingivalis GroEL induces osteoclastogenesis of periodontal ligament cells and enhances alveolar bone resorption in rats. / Lin, Feng Yen; Hsiao, Fung Ping; Huang, Chun Yao; Shih, Chun Ming; Tsao, Nai Wen; Tsai, Chien Sung; Yang, Shue Fen; Chang, Nen Chung; Hung, Shan Ling; Lin, Yi Wen.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 7, e102450, 24.07.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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