Physiological and Biochemical Effects of Intrinsically High and Low Exercise Capacities Through Multiomics Approaches

Yu Tang Tung, Yi Ju Hsu, Chen Chung Liao, Shang Tse Ho, Chi Chang Huang, Wen Ching Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Regular exercise prevents lipid abnormalities and conditions such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and obesity; it considerably benefits sedentary individuals. However, individuals exhibit highly variable responses to exercise, probably due to genetic variations. Animal models are typically used to investigate the relationship of intrinsic exercise capacity with physiological, pathological, psychological, behavioral, and metabolic disorders. In the present study, we investigated differential physiological adaptations caused by intrinsic exercise capacity and explored the regulatory molecules or mechanisms through multiomics approaches. Outbred ICR mice (n = 100) performed an exhaustive swimming test and were ranked based on the exhaustive swimming time to distinguish intrinsically high- and low-capacity groups. Exercise performance, exercise fatigue indexes, glucose tolerance, and body compositions were assessed during the experimental processes. Furthermore, the gut microbiota, transcriptome, and proteome of soleus muscle with intrinsically high exercise capacity (HEC) and low exercise capacity (LEC) were further analyzed to reveal the most influential factors associated with differential exercise capacities. HEC mice outperformed LEC mice in physical activities (exhaustive swimming and forelimb grip strength tests) and exhibited higher glucose tolerance than LEC mice. Exercise-induced peripheral fatigue and the level of injury biomarkers (lactate, ammonia, creatine kinase, and aspartate aminotransferase) were also significantly lower in HEC mice than in LEC mice. Furthermore, the gut of the HEC mice contained significantly more Butyricicoccus than that of the LEC mice. In addition, transcriptome data of the soleus muscle revealed that the expression of microRNAs that are strongly associated with exercise performance-related physiological and metabolic functions (i.e., miR-383, miR-107, miR-30b, miR-669m, miR-191, miR-218, and miR-224) was higher in HEC mice than in LEC mice. The functional proteome data of soleus muscle indicated that the levels of key proteins related to muscle function and carbohydrate metabolism were also significantly higher in HEC mice than in LEC mice. Our study demonstrated that the mice with various intrinsic exercise capacities have different gut microbiome as well as transcriptome and proteome of soleus muscle by using multiomics approaches. The specific bacteria and regulatory factors, including miRNA and functional proteins, may be highly correlated with the adaptation of physiological functions and exercise capacity.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1201
JournalFrontiers in Physiology
Volume10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 18 2019

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Skeletal Muscle
Proteome
Transcriptome
Physiological Adaptation
MicroRNAs
Fatigue
Glucose
Inbred ICR Mouse
Exercise Tolerance
Forelimb
Carbohydrate Metabolism
Hand Strength
Creatine Kinase
Aspartate Aminotransferases
Body Composition
Lactic Acid
Diabetes Mellitus
Proteins
Animal Models
Obesity

Keywords

  • gut microbiota
  • intrinsic exercise capacity
  • physical activities
  • proteome
  • transcriptome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Physiological and Biochemical Effects of Intrinsically High and Low Exercise Capacities Through Multiomics Approaches. / Tung, Yu Tang; Hsu, Yi Ju; Liao, Chen Chung; Ho, Shang Tse; Huang, Chi Chang; Huang, Wen Ching.

In: Frontiers in Physiology, Vol. 10, 1201, 18.09.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tung, Yu Tang ; Hsu, Yi Ju ; Liao, Chen Chung ; Ho, Shang Tse ; Huang, Chi Chang ; Huang, Wen Ching. / Physiological and Biochemical Effects of Intrinsically High and Low Exercise Capacities Through Multiomics Approaches. In: Frontiers in Physiology. 2019 ; Vol. 10.
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