Physical activity and successful aging among middle-aged and older adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies

Yi Hsuan Lin, Yi Chun Chen, Yen Chiang Tseng, Shih Tzu Tsai, Yen Han Tseng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We aimed to investigate the association between physical activity and successful aging among middle-aged and older adults and study how this association changes with age and time. Results: The mean score of Newcastle-Ottawa Scale assessment was 8.0±0.8. Physically active middle-aged and older adults were more likely to age successfully than sedentary adults (OR=1.64, 95%CI: 1.40-1.94). The effect of physical activity was stronger in the younger group (OR=1.71, 95%CI: 1.41-2.08) than on the older group (OR=1.54, 95%CI: 1.13-2.08). However, the protective effect of physical activity reduced annually by approximately 3%. Conclusions: Physical activity promotes successful aging among middle-aged and older adults especially in the younger population. Being physically active at middle and old age is beneficial to successful aging. Methods: We searched for the relevant studies in three online databases: Pubmed, Web of Science, and Embase. Fifteen community-based cohort studies were included. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale assessment Form was used for quality assessment. Overall, 189,192 participants aged 43.9-79.0 years were analyzed. The odds ratio for successful aging of the most physically active group compared with sedentary group was analyzed. Subgroup analysis was conducted by age group. Univariate Meta-regression was performed according to follow-up years.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7704-7716
Number of pages13
JournalAging
Volume12
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 15 2020

Keywords

  • Exercise
  • Healthy aging
  • Older people
  • Physical activity
  • Successful aging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ageing
  • Cell Biology

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