Pharmacokinetic model of daily selenium intake from contaminated seafood in Taiwan

Ling Chu Chien, Ching-Ying Yeh, Shih Yi Huang, Ming-Che Hsieh, Bor Cheng Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Contaminated seafood has been reported as an important source of human exposure to metals in Taiwan. Seafood represents a non-negligible source of selenium in the human diet. This study was designed to determine the concentration of selenium in different types of seafood and predict the concentration of selenium in the blood of Taiwanese using a one-compartment steady-state pharmacokinetic (PK) model. Samples involved three subgroups, including fish, crustaceans and bivalve molluscs. Quantitative analysis for selenium was performed using an ICP-AES (Perkin Elmer) instrument. Selenium concentrations in seafood ranged from 0.63 to 2.01 μg/g wet wt. The highest selenium concentration found in fish was 2.01±0.36 μg/g wet wt in Salmo salar Linnaeus. In general, selenium concentration increased in the order of bivalve molluscs

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)57-64
Number of pages8
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume311
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 20 2003

Fingerprint

Pharmacokinetics
seafood
Selenium
selenium
Molluscs
mollusc
Fish
bivalve
Nutrition
fish
pharmacokinetics
quantitative analysis
crustacean
Blood
blood
Metals
diet
metal
Chemical analysis

Keywords

  • Daily intake
  • Pharmacokinetic model
  • Seafood
  • Selenium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Pharmacokinetic model of daily selenium intake from contaminated seafood in Taiwan. / Chien, Ling Chu; Yeh, Ching-Ying; Huang, Shih Yi; Hsieh, Ming-Che; Han, Bor Cheng.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 311, No. 1-3, 20.07.2003, p. 57-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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