Pharmacist-directed reconciliation for reducing medication discrepancies: A pilot study in a nursing home setting in Taiwan

Chun Nan Kuo, You Meei Lin, Man Tzu Wu, Li Na Kuo, Li Wen Lee, Hsiang Yin Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nursing home residents are at risk for medication errors when being transferred between wards. Medication reconciliation is a process used to verify medication use, identify variations and rectify medication errors during transitions. This pilot study was performed to evaluate a pharmacist-directed medication-reconciliation program in a nursing home setting. The number and types of discrepancies 3 months before (the control period) and after (the study period) implementation of a medication-reconciliation program were compared. A pharmacist performed medication reconciliation and discussed discrepancies with care providers in the study period. There were 190/209 (90.9%) and 220/266 (82.7%) documented discrepancies during the control and study periods, respectively. The major discrepancies found in both periods were the addition or omission of drugs. Of the 46 undocumented discrepancies in the study period, 13 (28.3%) were confirmed to be intentional changes. The suggestions made by the pharmacist were accepted in 19 of the remaining 33 undocumented (and unintentional) discrepancies. Eleven of 12 harmful discrepancies in the study period were corrected in a timely manner as a result of the medication- reconciliation program, that is, 91.7% of the harmful discrepancies were successfully prevented. But five (26.3%) harmful unintentional discrepancies of the 19 undocumented discrepancies in the control period could not be prevented from affecting patients. Pharmacist-directed medication reconciliation can reduce medication discrepancies in a nursing home setting in Taiwan.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)160-164
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Food and Drug Analysis
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

Fingerprint

Medication Reconciliation
nursing homes
Nursing Homes
Taiwan
Pharmacists
drug therapy
Medication Errors
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Medication discrepancies
  • Medication errors
  • Medication reconciliation
  • Nursing home
  • Pharmacist

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Pharmacist-directed reconciliation for reducing medication discrepancies : A pilot study in a nursing home setting in Taiwan. / Kuo, Chun Nan; Lin, You Meei; Wu, Man Tzu; Kuo, Li Na; Lee, Li Wen; Chen, Hsiang Yin.

In: Journal of Food and Drug Analysis, Vol. 21, No. 2, 06.2013, p. 160-164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{01800c4d000843f89722b2d9af4599b0,
title = "Pharmacist-directed reconciliation for reducing medication discrepancies: A pilot study in a nursing home setting in Taiwan",
abstract = "Nursing home residents are at risk for medication errors when being transferred between wards. Medication reconciliation is a process used to verify medication use, identify variations and rectify medication errors during transitions. This pilot study was performed to evaluate a pharmacist-directed medication-reconciliation program in a nursing home setting. The number and types of discrepancies 3 months before (the control period) and after (the study period) implementation of a medication-reconciliation program were compared. A pharmacist performed medication reconciliation and discussed discrepancies with care providers in the study period. There were 190/209 (90.9{\%}) and 220/266 (82.7{\%}) documented discrepancies during the control and study periods, respectively. The major discrepancies found in both periods were the addition or omission of drugs. Of the 46 undocumented discrepancies in the study period, 13 (28.3{\%}) were confirmed to be intentional changes. The suggestions made by the pharmacist were accepted in 19 of the remaining 33 undocumented (and unintentional) discrepancies. Eleven of 12 harmful discrepancies in the study period were corrected in a timely manner as a result of the medication- reconciliation program, that is, 91.7{\%} of the harmful discrepancies were successfully prevented. But five (26.3{\%}) harmful unintentional discrepancies of the 19 undocumented discrepancies in the control period could not be prevented from affecting patients. Pharmacist-directed medication reconciliation can reduce medication discrepancies in a nursing home setting in Taiwan.",
keywords = "Medication discrepancies, Medication errors, Medication reconciliation, Nursing home, Pharmacist",
author = "Kuo, {Chun Nan} and Lin, {You Meei} and Wu, {Man Tzu} and Kuo, {Li Na} and Lee, {Li Wen} and Chen, {Hsiang Yin}",
year = "2013",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.jfda.2013.05.005",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "160--164",
journal = "Journal of Food and Drug Analysis",
issn = "1021-9498",
publisher = "Elsevier Taiwan LLC",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pharmacist-directed reconciliation for reducing medication discrepancies

T2 - A pilot study in a nursing home setting in Taiwan

AU - Kuo, Chun Nan

AU - Lin, You Meei

AU - Wu, Man Tzu

AU - Kuo, Li Na

AU - Lee, Li Wen

AU - Chen, Hsiang Yin

PY - 2013/6

Y1 - 2013/6

N2 - Nursing home residents are at risk for medication errors when being transferred between wards. Medication reconciliation is a process used to verify medication use, identify variations and rectify medication errors during transitions. This pilot study was performed to evaluate a pharmacist-directed medication-reconciliation program in a nursing home setting. The number and types of discrepancies 3 months before (the control period) and after (the study period) implementation of a medication-reconciliation program were compared. A pharmacist performed medication reconciliation and discussed discrepancies with care providers in the study period. There were 190/209 (90.9%) and 220/266 (82.7%) documented discrepancies during the control and study periods, respectively. The major discrepancies found in both periods were the addition or omission of drugs. Of the 46 undocumented discrepancies in the study period, 13 (28.3%) were confirmed to be intentional changes. The suggestions made by the pharmacist were accepted in 19 of the remaining 33 undocumented (and unintentional) discrepancies. Eleven of 12 harmful discrepancies in the study period were corrected in a timely manner as a result of the medication- reconciliation program, that is, 91.7% of the harmful discrepancies were successfully prevented. But five (26.3%) harmful unintentional discrepancies of the 19 undocumented discrepancies in the control period could not be prevented from affecting patients. Pharmacist-directed medication reconciliation can reduce medication discrepancies in a nursing home setting in Taiwan.

AB - Nursing home residents are at risk for medication errors when being transferred between wards. Medication reconciliation is a process used to verify medication use, identify variations and rectify medication errors during transitions. This pilot study was performed to evaluate a pharmacist-directed medication-reconciliation program in a nursing home setting. The number and types of discrepancies 3 months before (the control period) and after (the study period) implementation of a medication-reconciliation program were compared. A pharmacist performed medication reconciliation and discussed discrepancies with care providers in the study period. There were 190/209 (90.9%) and 220/266 (82.7%) documented discrepancies during the control and study periods, respectively. The major discrepancies found in both periods were the addition or omission of drugs. Of the 46 undocumented discrepancies in the study period, 13 (28.3%) were confirmed to be intentional changes. The suggestions made by the pharmacist were accepted in 19 of the remaining 33 undocumented (and unintentional) discrepancies. Eleven of 12 harmful discrepancies in the study period were corrected in a timely manner as a result of the medication- reconciliation program, that is, 91.7% of the harmful discrepancies were successfully prevented. But five (26.3%) harmful unintentional discrepancies of the 19 undocumented discrepancies in the control period could not be prevented from affecting patients. Pharmacist-directed medication reconciliation can reduce medication discrepancies in a nursing home setting in Taiwan.

KW - Medication discrepancies

KW - Medication errors

KW - Medication reconciliation

KW - Nursing home

KW - Pharmacist

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84881429515&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84881429515&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jfda.2013.05.005

DO - 10.1016/j.jfda.2013.05.005

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84881429515

VL - 21

SP - 160

EP - 164

JO - Journal of Food and Drug Analysis

JF - Journal of Food and Drug Analysis

SN - 1021-9498

IS - 2

ER -