Peritoneal metastasis of glioblastoma multiforme via ventriculo-peritoneal shunt

Jang Chun Lin, Wei Hsiu Liu, Hsin I. Ma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Internal drainage of cerebrospinal fluid to the abdominal cavity via a ventriculoperitoneal shunt is commonly used for treatment of obstructive hydrocephalus. High-grade gliomas often block the natural cerebrospinal fluid pathways, but a ventriculoperitoneal shunt, as an artificial anastomosis, can provide a pathway for tumor cells to be spread with the cerebrospinal fluid. We present a 27-year-old-male diagnosed with intracranial glioblastoma multiforme. The patient had abdominal distension, poor appetite, and vomiting. Abdominal computed topography showed a large amount of ascites in the abdominal cavity and multiple tiny soft tissue nodules of the omentum. Endoscopic biopsy of nodules over the omentum was performed by a general surgeon. Pathologic examination revealed metastatic glioblastoma multiforme. Unfortunately, the patient died 2 months after peritoneal metastasis of glioblastoma multiforme via a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was impressed. The pattern of peritoneal metastasis seen in this patient is typical of tumors that directly seed the peritoneal cavity and implicates the ventriculoperitoneal shunt as the vehicle of extraneural spread. Although metastasis via a ventriculoperitoneal shunt is rare, the possibility should be considered if patients with glioblastoma multiforme complain of unexplained abdominal distension, increase in abdominal girth, or persistent abdominal pain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)179-182
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Medical Sciences (Taiwan)
Volume32
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Nov 19 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt
Glioblastoma
Neoplasm Metastasis
Omentum
Abdominal Cavity
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Peritoneal Cavity
Appetite
Hydrocephalus
Ascites
Glioma
Abdominal Pain
Vomiting
Neoplasms
Seeds
Biopsy

Keywords

  • Glioblastoma multiforme
  • Peritoneal metastasis
  • Ventriculo-peritoneal shunt

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Peritoneal metastasis of glioblastoma multiforme via ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. / Lin, Jang Chun; Liu, Wei Hsiu; Ma, Hsin I.

In: Journal of Medical Sciences (Taiwan), Vol. 32, No. 4, 19.11.2012, p. 179-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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