Abstract

Endometriosis, a frequently encountered disease in gynecology, is a considerable threat to the physical, psychological, and social integrity of women. Moreover, up to 50% of infertile patients have this disease. The etiology and pathogenesis of this important disease are poorly understood; it is defined as an ectopic location for endometrium-like glandular epithelium and stroma outside of the uterine cavity. It still remains an open question as to what extent the peritoneal environment influences the establishment and/or progression of endometriosis. As a result of such stress, a sterile, inflammatory reaction with the secretion of growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines is generated, which is especially deleterious to successful reproduction. Significantly higher amounts of oxidative damage were detected in endometriotic lesions than in controlled normal endometrium, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rearrangement, 8-OH-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), and lipoperoxide contents. There were approximately sixfold increases in 8-OH-dG and lipoperoxides in chocolate cysts compared with normal endometrial tissues. A novel 5,335-bp deletion of mtDNA was identified in endometriotic tissue. According to these results, we propose that oxidative stress and mtDNA mutations might be anticipated in the initiation or progression of endometriosis. Only by understanding the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of endometriosis can we develop a basis for new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)186-194
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1042
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Endometriosis
Mitochondrial DNA
Deoxyguanosine
Lipid Peroxides
Mutation
Gynecology
Endometrium
Tissue
Oxidative stress
Chemokines
Gene Rearrangement
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Cytokines
Reproduction
Cysts
Oxidative Stress
Epithelium
Psychology
Damage
hydroxide ion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Oxidative damage and mitochondrial DNA mutations with endometriosis. / Kao, Shu Huei; Huang, Hsieng Chiang; Hsieh, Rong Hong; Chen, Su Chee; Tsai, Ming-Chuan; Tzeng, Chii Reuy.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 1042, 2005, p. 186-194.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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