Open reconstruction of large bony glenoid erosion with allogeneic bone graft for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation

Pei W. Weng, Hsain Chung Shen, Hsieh Hsing Lee, Shing-Sheng Wu, Chian H. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Severe glenoid bone loss in recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability is rare and difficult to treat. Purpose: The authors present a surgical technique using allogeneic bone grafting for open anatomic glenoid reconstruction in addition to the capsular shift procedure. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Nine consecutive patients with a history of recurrent anterior shoulder instability underwent reconstruction of large bony glenoid erosion with a femoral head allograft combined with an anteroinferior capsular shift procedure. Preoperative computed tomographic and arthroscopic evaluation was performed to confirm a ≥120° osseous defect of the anteroinferior quadrant of the glenoid cavity, which had an "inverted-pear" appearance. Patients were followed for at least 4.5 years (range, 4.5-14). Serial postoperative radiographs were evaluated. Functional outcomes were assessed using Rowe scores. Results: All grafts showed bony union within 6 months after surgery. The mean Rowe score improved to 84 from a preoperative score of 24. The mean loss of external rotation was 7° compared with the normal shoulder. One subluxation and 1 dislocation occurred after grand mal seizures during follow-up. These 2 patients regained shoulder stability after closed reduction. The remaining patients did not report recurrent instability. All patients resumed daily activities without restricted motion. Conclusion: This technique for open reconstruction is viable for the treatment of recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability with large bony glenoid erosion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1792-1797
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume37
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Shoulder Dislocation
Transplants
Bone and Bones
Glenoid Cavity
Pyrus
Bone Transplantation
Thigh
Allografts
Seizures

Keywords

  • Allogeneic bone graft
  • Epilepsy
  • Glenoid reconstruction
  • Shoulder instability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Open reconstruction of large bony glenoid erosion with allogeneic bone graft for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. / Weng, Pei W.; Shen, Hsain Chung; Lee, Hsieh Hsing; Wu, Shing-Sheng; Lee, Chian H.

In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 37, No. 9, 2009, p. 1792-1797.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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