Okadaic acid, a bioactive fatty acid from Halichondria okadai, stimulates lipolysis in rat adipocytes: The pivotal role of perilipin translocation

Nen Chung Chang, Aming Chor Ming Lin, Cheng Chen Hsu, Jung Sheng Liu, Leo Tsui, Chien Yuan Chen, Thanasekaran Jayakumar, Tsorng Harn Fong

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Abstract

Lipid metabolism in visceral fat cells is correlated with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. Okadaic-acid, a 38-carbon fatty acid isolated from the black sponge Halichondria okadai, can stimulate lipolysis by promoting the phosphorylation of several proteins in adipocytes. However, the mechanism of okadaic acid-induced lipolysis and the effects of okadaic acid on lipid-droplet-associated proteins (perilipins and beta-actin) remain unclear. We isolated adipocytes from rat epididymal fat pads and treated them with isoproterenol and/or okadaic acid to estimate lipolysis by measuring glycerol release. Incubating adipocytes with okadaic acid stimulated time-dependent lipolysis. Lipid-droplet-associated perilipins and beta-actin were analyzed by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence, and the association of perilipin A and B was found to be decreased in response to isoproterenol or okadaic acid treatment. Moreover, okadaic-acid treatment could enhance isoproterenol-mediated lipolysis, whereas treatment of several inhibitors such as KT-5720 (PKA inhibitor), calphostin C (PKC inhibitor), or KT-5823 (PKG inhibitor) did not attenuate okadaic-acid-induced lipolysis. By contrast, vanadyl acetylacetonate (tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor) blocked okadaic-acid-dependent lipolysis. These results suggest that okadaic acid induces the phosphorylation and detachment of lipid-droplet-associated perilipin A and B from the lipid droplet surface and thereby leads to accelerated lipolysis.

Original languageEnglish
Article number545739
JournalEvidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Okadaic Acid
Lipolysis
Adipocytes
Fatty Acids
Isoproterenol
Actins
Phosphorylation
Perilipin-1
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Metabolic Diseases
Porifera
Lipid Metabolism
Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases
Immunoblotting
Glycerol
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Tyrosine
Adipose Tissue
Cardiovascular Diseases
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

Okadaic acid, a bioactive fatty acid from Halichondria okadai, stimulates lipolysis in rat adipocytes : The pivotal role of perilipin translocation. / Chang, Nen Chung; Lin, Aming Chor Ming; Hsu, Cheng Chen; Liu, Jung Sheng; Tsui, Leo; Chen, Chien Yuan; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Fong, Tsorng Harn.

In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Vol. 2013, 545739, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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