No effect of cigarette smoking dose on oxidized plasma proteins

Chih Ching Yeh, R. Graham Barr, Charles A. Powell, Sonia Mesia-Vela, Yuanjia Wang, Nada K. Hamade, J. H M Austin, Regina M. Santella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cigarette smoking is a major source of oxidative stress. Protein carbonyls have been used as a biomarker of oxidative stress because of the relative stability of carbonylated proteins and the high protein concentration in blood. Increased levels of carbonyl groups have been found in serum proteins of smokers compared to nonsmokers. However, neither the dose effect of current cigarette smoke nor other predictors of oxidative stress have been studied. Hence, we used an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) to evaluate plasma protein carbonyls in smokers recruited in the Early Lung Cancer Action Project (ELCAP) program. The lung cancer screening program enrolled current and former smokers age 60 years and over without a prior cancer diagnosis. A total of 542 participants (282 men and 260 women) completed a baseline questionnaire and provided blood samples for the biomarker study. Protein oxidation was measured by derivatization of the carbonyl groups with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) and ELISA quantitation of the DNPH group. Current smoking status was confirmed with urinary cotinine. The mean (±S.D.) protein carbonyl level was 17.9±2.9 nmol carbonyl/ml plasma. Protein carbonyls did not differ significantly by gender. Carbonyl levels were higher among current than former smokers, but these differences did not attain statistical significance, nor did differences by urine cotinine levels, pack-years, pack/day among current smokers, and smoking duration. In a multiple regression analysis, higher protein carbonyl levels were independently associated with increasing age (0.59 nmol/ml increase per 10 years, 95% CI 0.14, 1.05, p=0.01), African-American vs. white race/ethnicity, (1.30 nmol/ml, 95% CI 0.4, 2.19, p=0.008), and lower educational attainment (0.75 nmol/ml, 95% CI 0.12, 1.38, p=0.02). Although we found no significant difference between current vs. past cigarette smoking and protein carbonyls in this older group of smokers, associations were found for age, ethnicity, and educational attainment. Our results indicate that the measurement of plasma carbonyls by this ELISA technique is still an easy and suitable method for studies of diseases related to oxidative stress.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)219-225
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume106
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

smoking
Tobacco Products
Blood Proteins
Smoking
plasma
protein
Oxidative stress
Immunosorbents
Oxidative Stress
Proteins
Cotinine
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Assays
Biomarkers
educational attainment
cancer
Lung Neoplasms
assay
enzyme
ethnicity

Keywords

  • Biomarker
  • Cigarette smoking
  • ELCAP
  • Oxidative stress
  • Protein carbonyls

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Yeh, C. C., Graham Barr, R., Powell, C. A., Mesia-Vela, S., Wang, Y., Hamade, N. K., ... Santella, R. M. (2008). No effect of cigarette smoking dose on oxidized plasma proteins. Environmental Research, 106(2), 219-225. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2007.09.008

No effect of cigarette smoking dose on oxidized plasma proteins. / Yeh, Chih Ching; Graham Barr, R.; Powell, Charles A.; Mesia-Vela, Sonia; Wang, Yuanjia; Hamade, Nada K.; Austin, J. H M; Santella, Regina M.

In: Environmental Research, Vol. 106, No. 2, 02.2008, p. 219-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yeh, CC, Graham Barr, R, Powell, CA, Mesia-Vela, S, Wang, Y, Hamade, NK, Austin, JHM & Santella, RM 2008, 'No effect of cigarette smoking dose on oxidized plasma proteins', Environmental Research, vol. 106, no. 2, pp. 219-225. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2007.09.008
Yeh CC, Graham Barr R, Powell CA, Mesia-Vela S, Wang Y, Hamade NK et al. No effect of cigarette smoking dose on oxidized plasma proteins. Environmental Research. 2008 Feb;106(2):219-225. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2007.09.008
Yeh, Chih Ching ; Graham Barr, R. ; Powell, Charles A. ; Mesia-Vela, Sonia ; Wang, Yuanjia ; Hamade, Nada K. ; Austin, J. H M ; Santella, Regina M. / No effect of cigarette smoking dose on oxidized plasma proteins. In: Environmental Research. 2008 ; Vol. 106, No. 2. pp. 219-225.
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