Nicotine-induced hyperlocomotion is not modified by the estrous cycle, ovariectomy and estradiol replacement at physiological level

Dong Yih Kuo, Tzer Bin Lin, Chiun Chien Huang, Sheau Ling Duh, Jiuan Miau Liao, Juei Tang Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study was designed to investigate whether nicotine's effect on locomotion might be modulated by the ovarian hormone at physiological level. Rats at normal cycling of estrus and diestrus were selected for the comparison of nicotine-induced hyperlocomotion based on the document that the release of striatal dopamine was greatest at the estrous phase. Ovariectomized rats primed with or without estrogen at physiological level were also selected for comparison. Increase in spontaneous locomotion by nicotine was statistically significant at the doses of 0.15 and 0.3 mg/kg (P<0.001). The stimulation effect of nicotine led the locomotor response to almost the same magnitude in all hormonal groups studied. Nicotine-induced hyperlocomotion appeared to be mediated by central nicotinic receptor because it was blocked by mecamylamine (0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg, i.p.). Also it was blocked by haloperidol (0.04 and 0.08 mg/kg, i.p.) indicating the involvement of dopaminergic neurotransmission. These effects were similar in all groups regardless of the estrous cycle or ovariectomy. The observed data provided behavioral evidence to suggest that the effect of nicotine on locomotion- related dopaminergic neurons might not be modified by the physiological action of estrogen.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-88
Number of pages6
JournalChinese Journal of Physiology
Volume42
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Dopaminergic system
  • Estrous cycle
  • Locomotor behavior
  • Nicotine
  • Ovariectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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