Neonatal status epilepticus alters prefrontal-striatal circuitry and enhances methamphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization in adolescence

Tzu Chao Lin, Li Tung Huang, Ya Ni Huang, Gunng Shinng Chen, Jia Yi Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neonatal seizures may alter the developing neurocircuitry and cause behavioral abnormalities in adulthood. We found that rats previously subjected to lithium-pilocarpine (LiPC)-induced neonatal status epilepticus (NeoSE) exhibited enhanced behavioral sensitization to methamphetamine (MA) in adolescence. Neurochemically, dopamine (DA) and metabolites were markedly decreased in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and insignificantly changed in striatum by NeoSE, but were increased in both PFC and striatum by NeoSE + MA. Glutamate levels were increased in both PFC and striatum in the NeoSE + MA group. DA turnover, an index of utilization and activity, was increased by NeoSE but reversed by MA in PFC. Gene expression of the regulator of G-protein signaling 4 (RGS4) was downregulated in PFC and striatum by NeoSE and further suppressed by MA. These findings suggest NeoSE affects both dopaminergic and glutamatergic systems in the prefrontal-striatal circuitry that manifests as enhanced behavioral sensitization to MA in adolescence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)316-323
Number of pages8
JournalEpilepsy and Behavior
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Behavioral sensitization
  • Dopamine
  • Glutamate
  • Methamphetamine
  • Neonatal status epilepticus
  • Prefrontal cortex
  • RGS4
  • Striatum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Neurology

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