Multilevel Analysis of the Effects of Individual- and Community-Level Factors on Childhood Anemia, Severe Anemia, and Hemoglobin Concentration in Malawi

Peter Austin Morton Ntenda, Kun-Yang Chuang, Fentanesh Nibret Tiruneh, Ying-Chih Chuang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this article was to examine individual- and community-level factors associated with childhood anemia, severe anemia, and hemoglobin (Hb) concentration in Malawi.

Methods: Using data from the 2010 Malawi demographic and health survey (MDHS), the multilevel regression models were constructed to analyze 2597 children aged 6-59 months living in 849 communities.

Results: The results showed that both childhood anemia and severe anemia were negatively associated with child's age, no fever in the previous 2 weeks and height-for-age, and positively associated with residing in poor household. Childhood anemia was negatively associated with community female education. Child's age, no fever in the previous 2 weeks and maternal Hb levels were positively associated with child Hb concentration, while residing in poorest households was negatively associated with children's Hb concentration.

Conclusion: Comprehensive public health strategies aimed at reducing childhood anemia need to focus more on the significant characteristics addressed in this study.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Tropical Pediatrics
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Jul 27 2017

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Multilevel Analysis
Malawi
Anemia
Hemoglobins
Fever
Public Health
Mothers
Demography
Education

Cite this

@article{b19f4612baa64d66aeec02bc258f0637,
title = "Multilevel Analysis of the Effects of Individual- and Community-Level Factors on Childhood Anemia, Severe Anemia, and Hemoglobin Concentration in Malawi",
abstract = "Background: The purpose of this article was to examine individual- and community-level factors associated with childhood anemia, severe anemia, and hemoglobin (Hb) concentration in Malawi.Methods: Using data from the 2010 Malawi demographic and health survey (MDHS), the multilevel regression models were constructed to analyze 2597 children aged 6-59 months living in 849 communities.Results: The results showed that both childhood anemia and severe anemia were negatively associated with child's age, no fever in the previous 2 weeks and height-for-age, and positively associated with residing in poor household. Childhood anemia was negatively associated with community female education. Child's age, no fever in the previous 2 weeks and maternal Hb levels were positively associated with child Hb concentration, while residing in poorest households was negatively associated with children's Hb concentration.Conclusion: Comprehensive public health strategies aimed at reducing childhood anemia need to focus more on the significant characteristics addressed in this study.",
author = "Ntenda, {Peter Austin Morton} and Kun-Yang Chuang and Tiruneh, {Fentanesh Nibret} and Ying-Chih Chuang",
note = "{\circledC} The Author [2017]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com",
year = "2017",
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doi = "10.1093/tropej/fmx059",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Tropical Pediatrics",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Multilevel Analysis of the Effects of Individual- and Community-Level Factors on Childhood Anemia, Severe Anemia, and Hemoglobin Concentration in Malawi

AU - Ntenda, Peter Austin Morton

AU - Chuang, Kun-Yang

AU - Tiruneh, Fentanesh Nibret

AU - Chuang, Ying-Chih

N1 - © The Author [2017]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

PY - 2017/7/27

Y1 - 2017/7/27

N2 - Background: The purpose of this article was to examine individual- and community-level factors associated with childhood anemia, severe anemia, and hemoglobin (Hb) concentration in Malawi.Methods: Using data from the 2010 Malawi demographic and health survey (MDHS), the multilevel regression models were constructed to analyze 2597 children aged 6-59 months living in 849 communities.Results: The results showed that both childhood anemia and severe anemia were negatively associated with child's age, no fever in the previous 2 weeks and height-for-age, and positively associated with residing in poor household. Childhood anemia was negatively associated with community female education. Child's age, no fever in the previous 2 weeks and maternal Hb levels were positively associated with child Hb concentration, while residing in poorest households was negatively associated with children's Hb concentration.Conclusion: Comprehensive public health strategies aimed at reducing childhood anemia need to focus more on the significant characteristics addressed in this study.

AB - Background: The purpose of this article was to examine individual- and community-level factors associated with childhood anemia, severe anemia, and hemoglobin (Hb) concentration in Malawi.Methods: Using data from the 2010 Malawi demographic and health survey (MDHS), the multilevel regression models were constructed to analyze 2597 children aged 6-59 months living in 849 communities.Results: The results showed that both childhood anemia and severe anemia were negatively associated with child's age, no fever in the previous 2 weeks and height-for-age, and positively associated with residing in poor household. Childhood anemia was negatively associated with community female education. Child's age, no fever in the previous 2 weeks and maternal Hb levels were positively associated with child Hb concentration, while residing in poorest households was negatively associated with children's Hb concentration.Conclusion: Comprehensive public health strategies aimed at reducing childhood anemia need to focus more on the significant characteristics addressed in this study.

U2 - 10.1093/tropej/fmx059

DO - 10.1093/tropej/fmx059

M3 - Article

C2 - 28977637

JO - Journal of Tropical Pediatrics

JF - Journal of Tropical Pediatrics

SN - 0142-6338

ER -