Mouth breathing, “nasal disuse,” and pediatric sleep-disordered breathing

Seo Young Lee, Christian Guilleminault, Hsiao-Yean Chiu, Shannon S. Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Adenotonsillectomy (T&A) may not completely eliminate sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), and residual SDB can result in progressive worsening of abnormal breathing during sleep. Persistence of mouth breathing post-T&As plays a role in progressive worsening through an increase of upper airway resistance during sleep with secondary impact on orofacial growth. Methods: Retrospective study on non-overweight and non-syndromic prepubertal children with SDB treated by T&A with pre- and post-surgery clinical and polysomnographic (PSG) evaluations including systematic monitoring of mouth breathing (initial cohort). All children with mouth breathing were then referred for myofunctional treatment (MFT), with clinical follow-up 6 months later and PSG 1 year post-surgery. Only a limited subgroup followed the recommendations to undergo MFT with subsequent PSG (follow-up subgroup). Results: Sixty-four prepubertal children meeting inclusion criteria for the initial cohort were investigated. There was significant symptomatic improvement in all children post-T&A, but 26 children had residual SDB with an AHI > 1.5 events/hour and 35 children (including the previous 26) had evidence of “mouth breathing” during sleep as defined [minimum of 44 % and a maximum of 100 % of total sleep time, mean 69 ± 11 % “mouth breather” subgroup and mean 4 ± 3.9 %, range 0 and 10.3 % “non-mouth breathers”]. Eighteen children (follow-up cohort), all in the “mouth breathing” group, were investigated at 1 year follow-up with only nine having undergone 6 months of MFT. The non- MFT subjects were significantly worse than the MFT-treated cohort. MFT led to normalization of clinical and PSG findings. Conclusion: Assessment of mouth breathing during sleep should be systematically performed post-T&A and the persistence of mouth breathing should be treated with MFT.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1257-1264
Number of pages8
JournalSleep and Breathing
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2015

Fingerprint

Mouth Breathing
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Nose
Pediatrics
Sleep
Therapeutics
Airway Resistance
Mouth
Respiration
Retrospective Studies

Keywords

  • Adenotonsillectomy
  • Apnea-hypopnea index worsening
  • Mouth breathing
  • Myofunctional treatment
  • Sleep-disordered breathing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Mouth breathing, “nasal disuse,” and pediatric sleep-disordered breathing. / Lee, Seo Young; Guilleminault, Christian; Chiu, Hsiao-Yean; Sullivan, Shannon S.

In: Sleep and Breathing, Vol. 19, No. 4, 01.12.2015, p. 1257-1264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Seo Young ; Guilleminault, Christian ; Chiu, Hsiao-Yean ; Sullivan, Shannon S. / Mouth breathing, “nasal disuse,” and pediatric sleep-disordered breathing. In: Sleep and Breathing. 2015 ; Vol. 19, No. 4. pp. 1257-1264.
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