Molecular modulation of allergic responses

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The pathophysiology of allergic diseases involves an intricate network of molecular and cellular interactions. Elevated levels of serum IgE- and T H2 cytokine-associated eosinophilic inflammation characterize allergic diseases and provide potential targets for immunomodulation. Recent evidence that antigen-induced allergic responses can be modulated in rodents by mucosal transfer of T H1-cytokine genes or by immunization with plasmid DNAs encoding the sensitizing antigens suggests promising new prophylactic or therapeutic approaches. Innovative research in mapping the regulatory pathways that typify the atopy network will provide a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these diseases and facilitate the design of more specific and efficacious modulation strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)887-892
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume102
Issue number6 II
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cytokines
Antigens
Immunomodulation
Immunoglobulin E
Rodentia
Immunization
Plasmids
Inflammation
DNA
Serum
Research
Genes
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Allergic inflammation
  • Cytokine-gene transfer
  • DNA-based immunization
  • Molecular modulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Molecular modulation of allergic responses. / Huang, Shau Ku.

In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 102, No. 6 II, 01.12.1998, p. 887-892.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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