Modulation of Mitotic Signal Transduction by Curcumin and Tea Polyphenols and Their Implication for Cancer Chemoprevention

Jen Kun Lin, Yu Chih Liang, Yu Li Lin, Yen Chou Chen, Shoei Yn Lin Shiau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

It has been demonstrated that diets rich in fruits and vegetables are protective aganist cardiovascular diseases and certain forms of cancer. These protective effects have been attributed to the anti-oxidant present, including vitamin C, Carotenes and phytopolyphenols. The polyphenolic components of higher plants may act as anti-oxidants (sometimes may be as pro-oxidants), or as agents of other mechanisms, contributing to the anti-carcinogenic or cadioprotective action. Curcumin is a widely used dietary pigment (curry), and this polyphenolic compound has been demonstrated to be an inhibitor of tumor promotion in chemical carcinogenesis. Recent studies also indicate that tea polyphenols are active in inhibiting the processes of carcinogenesis induced by various carcinogens. Investigations from this laboratory and others have indicated that modulation of mitotic signal transduction may attribute, in part, to the molecular mechanisms of these cancer chemopreventive agents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)225-238
Number of pages14
JournalACS Symposium Series
Volume701
Publication statusPublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)

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