Modulation of antigen-induced anaphylaxis in mice by a traditional Chinese medicine formula, Guo Min Kang

Xiu Min Li, Qian Fei Wang, Brian Schofield, Jie Lin, Shau Ku Huang, Qi Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) formula, Guo Min Kang (GMK), has been used in clinics in China for allergic diseases, including type I immediate hypersensitivity, a potentially fatal disease, but its modulatory mechanism remains elusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the modulatory mechanisms of GMK in a mouse model of Ag-induced anaphylaxis. Ag (conalbumin) sensitized mice were treated with either PBS (sham) or GMK before (schedule A) or during (schedule B) sensitization, and various anaphylactic parameters were measured following Ag challenge, including symptom score, cutaneous hypersensitivity response, mast cell degranulation, plasma histamine levels and the levels of specific IgE and T-cell responses. Systemic anaphylaxis was investigated in mice immediately following Ag challenge, and the results showed that GMK-treated mice from both treatment schedules A and B showed significantly reduced symptom scores when compared with the sham-treated group. The reduction in symptom score was associated with a significant reduction in the level of Ag-induced cutaneous immediate hypersensitivity. Also, GMK was able to suppress Ag-induced IgE production and T-cell responses, while it spares mitogen (Con A)-induced T-cell response. Further, treatment of mice with GMK abrogated the levels of Ag-induced histamine release and significantly reduced the number of degranulated mast cells. No effect of GMK was observed on the levels of total IgE and plasma histamine in naive mice. These results provide a basis for the modulation effect of GMK and suggest a potential utility of GMK as a prophylactic and therapeutic agent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)113-125
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Chinese Medicine
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Chinese Traditional Medicine
Anaphylaxis
Antigens
Immediate Hypersensitivity
Immunoglobulin E
Appointments and Schedules
T-Lymphocytes
Mast Cells
Histamine
Conalbumin
Cell Degranulation
Skin
Histamine Release
Mitogens
China
Hypersensitivity
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Allergic diseases
  • Anaphylaxis
  • Chinese herbal medicine
  • Guo Min Kang
  • Ma-Xing-Shi-Gan-Tang
  • Mouse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

Modulation of antigen-induced anaphylaxis in mice by a traditional Chinese medicine formula, Guo Min Kang. / Li, Xiu Min; Wang, Qian Fei; Schofield, Brian; Lin, Jie; Huang, Shau Ku; Wang, Qi.

In: American Journal of Chinese Medicine, Vol. 37, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 113-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Li, Xiu Min ; Wang, Qian Fei ; Schofield, Brian ; Lin, Jie ; Huang, Shau Ku ; Wang, Qi. / Modulation of antigen-induced anaphylaxis in mice by a traditional Chinese medicine formula, Guo Min Kang. In: American Journal of Chinese Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 37, No. 1. pp. 113-125.
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abstract = "A traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) formula, Guo Min Kang (GMK), has been used in clinics in China for allergic diseases, including type I immediate hypersensitivity, a potentially fatal disease, but its modulatory mechanism remains elusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the modulatory mechanisms of GMK in a mouse model of Ag-induced anaphylaxis. Ag (conalbumin) sensitized mice were treated with either PBS (sham) or GMK before (schedule A) or during (schedule B) sensitization, and various anaphylactic parameters were measured following Ag challenge, including symptom score, cutaneous hypersensitivity response, mast cell degranulation, plasma histamine levels and the levels of specific IgE and T-cell responses. Systemic anaphylaxis was investigated in mice immediately following Ag challenge, and the results showed that GMK-treated mice from both treatment schedules A and B showed significantly reduced symptom scores when compared with the sham-treated group. The reduction in symptom score was associated with a significant reduction in the level of Ag-induced cutaneous immediate hypersensitivity. Also, GMK was able to suppress Ag-induced IgE production and T-cell responses, while it spares mitogen (Con A)-induced T-cell response. Further, treatment of mice with GMK abrogated the levels of Ag-induced histamine release and significantly reduced the number of degranulated mast cells. No effect of GMK was observed on the levels of total IgE and plasma histamine in naive mice. These results provide a basis for the modulation effect of GMK and suggest a potential utility of GMK as a prophylactic and therapeutic agent.",
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