Microbiology Difference between Colonized Catheters and Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections

Che Lin, Ming Tsan Lin, Der Yirng Hsieh, Yann Fen C Chao, Sung Ling Yeh, Ming Shiang Wu, Jaw Tong Lin, Po Huang Lee, King Jen Chang, Wei Jao Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Aims: Central vein catheters for patients receiving total parenteral nutrition have a high incidence of colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections. However, the actual incidence and bacterial pattern have not been well studied. This study was undertaken to investigate the difference in bacteriology between colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections. Methodology: From January 1997 to March 1998, 354 patients receiving total parenteral nutrition were included in this study. The patients ranged in age from 49 to 80 years, 151 women and 203 men. Colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections were defined. Results: The culture was performed in 249 catheter tips (249 of 614, 40.6%). Sixty tips were found to have organisms. The organisms cultured from colonized catheters were Gram(+) aerobic bacteria (34, 56.7%), fungi (14, 23.3%), and Gram(-) aerobic bacteria (12, 20%). The organisms cultured from catheter-related bloodstream infections were fungi (16, 64%), Gram(-) aerobic bacteria (5, 20%), and Gram(+) aerobic bacteria (4, 16%). Dermatogenic infection in colonized catheters should be stressed, but systemic fungal infection in catheter-related bloodstream infections should be emphasized. Conclusions: A striking difference exists in bacterial species between colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections. Further studies on different treatment strategy for colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections should be undertaken. The combined approach of a total parenteral nutrition team, sterile protocols, and early diagnosis of fungemia should be advocated for the total parenteral nutrition patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1821-1824
Number of pages4
JournalHepato-Gastroenterology
Volume50
Issue number54
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2003

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Catheter-Related Infections
Microbiology
Catheters
Aerobic Bacteria
Total Parenteral Nutrition
Fungi
Fungemia
Bacteriology
Mycoses
Incidence
Early Diagnosis
Veins

Keywords

  • Catheterization
  • Microbiology
  • Parenteral hyperalimentation
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Lin, C., Lin, M. T., Hsieh, D. Y., Chao, Y. F. C., Yeh, S. L., Wu, M. S., ... Chen, W. J. (2003). Microbiology Difference between Colonized Catheters and Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections. Hepato-Gastroenterology, 50(54), 1821-1824.

Microbiology Difference between Colonized Catheters and Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections. / Lin, Che; Lin, Ming Tsan; Hsieh, Der Yirng; Chao, Yann Fen C; Yeh, Sung Ling; Wu, Ming Shiang; Lin, Jaw Tong; Lee, Po Huang; Chang, King Jen; Chen, Wei Jao.

In: Hepato-Gastroenterology, Vol. 50, No. 54, 11.2003, p. 1821-1824.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lin, C, Lin, MT, Hsieh, DY, Chao, YFC, Yeh, SL, Wu, MS, Lin, JT, Lee, PH, Chang, KJ & Chen, WJ 2003, 'Microbiology Difference between Colonized Catheters and Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections', Hepato-Gastroenterology, vol. 50, no. 54, pp. 1821-1824.
Lin C, Lin MT, Hsieh DY, Chao YFC, Yeh SL, Wu MS et al. Microbiology Difference between Colonized Catheters and Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections. Hepato-Gastroenterology. 2003 Nov;50(54):1821-1824.
Lin, Che ; Lin, Ming Tsan ; Hsieh, Der Yirng ; Chao, Yann Fen C ; Yeh, Sung Ling ; Wu, Ming Shiang ; Lin, Jaw Tong ; Lee, Po Huang ; Chang, King Jen ; Chen, Wei Jao. / Microbiology Difference between Colonized Catheters and Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections. In: Hepato-Gastroenterology. 2003 ; Vol. 50, No. 54. pp. 1821-1824.
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abstract = "Background/Aims: Central vein catheters for patients receiving total parenteral nutrition have a high incidence of colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections. However, the actual incidence and bacterial pattern have not been well studied. This study was undertaken to investigate the difference in bacteriology between colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections. Methodology: From January 1997 to March 1998, 354 patients receiving total parenteral nutrition were included in this study. The patients ranged in age from 49 to 80 years, 151 women and 203 men. Colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections were defined. Results: The culture was performed in 249 catheter tips (249 of 614, 40.6{\%}). Sixty tips were found to have organisms. The organisms cultured from colonized catheters were Gram(+) aerobic bacteria (34, 56.7{\%}), fungi (14, 23.3{\%}), and Gram(-) aerobic bacteria (12, 20{\%}). The organisms cultured from catheter-related bloodstream infections were fungi (16, 64{\%}), Gram(-) aerobic bacteria (5, 20{\%}), and Gram(+) aerobic bacteria (4, 16{\%}). Dermatogenic infection in colonized catheters should be stressed, but systemic fungal infection in catheter-related bloodstream infections should be emphasized. Conclusions: A striking difference exists in bacterial species between colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections. Further studies on different treatment strategy for colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections should be undertaken. The combined approach of a total parenteral nutrition team, sterile protocols, and early diagnosis of fungemia should be advocated for the total parenteral nutrition patients.",
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AU - Lin, Che

AU - Lin, Ming Tsan

AU - Hsieh, Der Yirng

AU - Chao, Yann Fen C

AU - Yeh, Sung Ling

AU - Wu, Ming Shiang

AU - Lin, Jaw Tong

AU - Lee, Po Huang

AU - Chang, King Jen

AU - Chen, Wei Jao

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N2 - Background/Aims: Central vein catheters for patients receiving total parenteral nutrition have a high incidence of colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections. However, the actual incidence and bacterial pattern have not been well studied. This study was undertaken to investigate the difference in bacteriology between colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections. Methodology: From January 1997 to March 1998, 354 patients receiving total parenteral nutrition were included in this study. The patients ranged in age from 49 to 80 years, 151 women and 203 men. Colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections were defined. Results: The culture was performed in 249 catheter tips (249 of 614, 40.6%). Sixty tips were found to have organisms. The organisms cultured from colonized catheters were Gram(+) aerobic bacteria (34, 56.7%), fungi (14, 23.3%), and Gram(-) aerobic bacteria (12, 20%). The organisms cultured from catheter-related bloodstream infections were fungi (16, 64%), Gram(-) aerobic bacteria (5, 20%), and Gram(+) aerobic bacteria (4, 16%). Dermatogenic infection in colonized catheters should be stressed, but systemic fungal infection in catheter-related bloodstream infections should be emphasized. Conclusions: A striking difference exists in bacterial species between colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections. Further studies on different treatment strategy for colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections should be undertaken. The combined approach of a total parenteral nutrition team, sterile protocols, and early diagnosis of fungemia should be advocated for the total parenteral nutrition patients.

AB - Background/Aims: Central vein catheters for patients receiving total parenteral nutrition have a high incidence of colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections. However, the actual incidence and bacterial pattern have not been well studied. This study was undertaken to investigate the difference in bacteriology between colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections. Methodology: From January 1997 to March 1998, 354 patients receiving total parenteral nutrition were included in this study. The patients ranged in age from 49 to 80 years, 151 women and 203 men. Colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections were defined. Results: The culture was performed in 249 catheter tips (249 of 614, 40.6%). Sixty tips were found to have organisms. The organisms cultured from colonized catheters were Gram(+) aerobic bacteria (34, 56.7%), fungi (14, 23.3%), and Gram(-) aerobic bacteria (12, 20%). The organisms cultured from catheter-related bloodstream infections were fungi (16, 64%), Gram(-) aerobic bacteria (5, 20%), and Gram(+) aerobic bacteria (4, 16%). Dermatogenic infection in colonized catheters should be stressed, but systemic fungal infection in catheter-related bloodstream infections should be emphasized. Conclusions: A striking difference exists in bacterial species between colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections. Further studies on different treatment strategy for colonized catheters and catheter-related bloodstream infections should be undertaken. The combined approach of a total parenteral nutrition team, sterile protocols, and early diagnosis of fungemia should be advocated for the total parenteral nutrition patients.

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