Metabolic syndrome loses its predictive power in late-stage chronic kidney disease progression - A paradoxical phenomenon

C. C. Lee, C. Y. Sun, I. W. Wu, S. Y. Wang, M. S. Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a significant determinant of CKD. The aim of this study was to determine the possible impact of MS on CKD progression. Methods: 746 CKD subjects were included. The presence of MS was determined according to themodified criteria proposed by the Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III. The study endpointswere stage-to-stage CKD progression or starting renal replacement therapy during the study period. CKD Stages 1, 2 and 3 were defined as early-stage CKD, while CKD Stages 4 and 5were defined as late-stage CKD. Results: Early-stage CKD patients with MS had a higher risk of CKD progression than those without MS. Cox regression analysis showed that MS was a significant determinant of CKD progression in early-stage (HR: 1.60, p = 0.041) but not late-stage CKD patients (HR: 1.00, p = 0.975). The results of subgroup analysis in non-diabetic subjects also showed that only early-stage CKD subjects with MS had significant risks of CKD progression (HR: 2.21, p = 0.010). In diabetic patients, the association between MS and CKD progression was not significant in both early- and late-stage CKD. Conclusions: Our findings suggested that the impact of MS on CKD progression might be prominent in non-diabetic earlystage CKD subjects, and became non-significant in diabetic late-stage CKD and diabetic CKD patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)141-149
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Nephrology
Volume75
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Disease Progression
Renal Replacement Therapy
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Metabolic syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Metabolic syndrome loses its predictive power in late-stage chronic kidney disease progression - A paradoxical phenomenon. / Lee, C. C.; Sun, C. Y.; Wu, I. W.; Wang, S. Y.; Wu, M. S.

In: Clinical Nephrology, Vol. 75, No. 2, 02.2011, p. 141-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{083ccb13f6ed4f13b09f0df4bee6b81b,
title = "Metabolic syndrome loses its predictive power in late-stage chronic kidney disease progression - A paradoxical phenomenon",
abstract = "Background: Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a significant determinant of CKD. The aim of this study was to determine the possible impact of MS on CKD progression. Methods: 746 CKD subjects were included. The presence of MS was determined according to themodified criteria proposed by the Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III. The study endpointswere stage-to-stage CKD progression or starting renal replacement therapy during the study period. CKD Stages 1, 2 and 3 were defined as early-stage CKD, while CKD Stages 4 and 5were defined as late-stage CKD. Results: Early-stage CKD patients with MS had a higher risk of CKD progression than those without MS. Cox regression analysis showed that MS was a significant determinant of CKD progression in early-stage (HR: 1.60, p = 0.041) but not late-stage CKD patients (HR: 1.00, p = 0.975). The results of subgroup analysis in non-diabetic subjects also showed that only early-stage CKD subjects with MS had significant risks of CKD progression (HR: 2.21, p = 0.010). In diabetic patients, the association between MS and CKD progression was not significant in both early- and late-stage CKD. Conclusions: Our findings suggested that the impact of MS on CKD progression might be prominent in non-diabetic earlystage CKD subjects, and became non-significant in diabetic late-stage CKD and diabetic CKD patients.",
keywords = "Chronic kidney disease, Diabetes mellitus, Metabolic syndrome",
author = "Lee, {C. C.} and Sun, {C. Y.} and Wu, {I. W.} and Wang, {S. Y.} and Wu, {M. S.}",
year = "2011",
month = "2",
doi = "10.5414/CNP75141",
language = "English",
volume = "75",
pages = "141--149",
journal = "Clinical Nephrology",
issn = "0301-0430",
publisher = "Dustri-Verlag Dr. Karl Feistle",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metabolic syndrome loses its predictive power in late-stage chronic kidney disease progression - A paradoxical phenomenon

AU - Lee, C. C.

AU - Sun, C. Y.

AU - Wu, I. W.

AU - Wang, S. Y.

AU - Wu, M. S.

PY - 2011/2

Y1 - 2011/2

N2 - Background: Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a significant determinant of CKD. The aim of this study was to determine the possible impact of MS on CKD progression. Methods: 746 CKD subjects were included. The presence of MS was determined according to themodified criteria proposed by the Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III. The study endpointswere stage-to-stage CKD progression or starting renal replacement therapy during the study period. CKD Stages 1, 2 and 3 were defined as early-stage CKD, while CKD Stages 4 and 5were defined as late-stage CKD. Results: Early-stage CKD patients with MS had a higher risk of CKD progression than those without MS. Cox regression analysis showed that MS was a significant determinant of CKD progression in early-stage (HR: 1.60, p = 0.041) but not late-stage CKD patients (HR: 1.00, p = 0.975). The results of subgroup analysis in non-diabetic subjects also showed that only early-stage CKD subjects with MS had significant risks of CKD progression (HR: 2.21, p = 0.010). In diabetic patients, the association between MS and CKD progression was not significant in both early- and late-stage CKD. Conclusions: Our findings suggested that the impact of MS on CKD progression might be prominent in non-diabetic earlystage CKD subjects, and became non-significant in diabetic late-stage CKD and diabetic CKD patients.

AB - Background: Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a significant determinant of CKD. The aim of this study was to determine the possible impact of MS on CKD progression. Methods: 746 CKD subjects were included. The presence of MS was determined according to themodified criteria proposed by the Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III. The study endpointswere stage-to-stage CKD progression or starting renal replacement therapy during the study period. CKD Stages 1, 2 and 3 were defined as early-stage CKD, while CKD Stages 4 and 5were defined as late-stage CKD. Results: Early-stage CKD patients with MS had a higher risk of CKD progression than those without MS. Cox regression analysis showed that MS was a significant determinant of CKD progression in early-stage (HR: 1.60, p = 0.041) but not late-stage CKD patients (HR: 1.00, p = 0.975). The results of subgroup analysis in non-diabetic subjects also showed that only early-stage CKD subjects with MS had significant risks of CKD progression (HR: 2.21, p = 0.010). In diabetic patients, the association between MS and CKD progression was not significant in both early- and late-stage CKD. Conclusions: Our findings suggested that the impact of MS on CKD progression might be prominent in non-diabetic earlystage CKD subjects, and became non-significant in diabetic late-stage CKD and diabetic CKD patients.

KW - Chronic kidney disease

KW - Diabetes mellitus

KW - Metabolic syndrome

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79251499295&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79251499295&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5414/CNP75141

DO - 10.5414/CNP75141

M3 - Article

C2 - 21255544

AN - SCOPUS:79251499295

VL - 75

SP - 141

EP - 149

JO - Clinical Nephrology

JF - Clinical Nephrology

SN - 0301-0430

IS - 2

ER -