Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein concentration as independent correlates of chronic kidney disease

Tsan Yang, Yu Ching Chou, Chi Hong Chu, Shih H. Lin, Po Chien Hsieh, Chih Hsung Hsu, Chyi-Huey Bai, San Lin You, Chien An Sun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inflammation is a common phenotype for cardiometabolic disorders. In this study, we attempted to investigate inter-relationships between metabolic syndrome (MetS), C-reactive protein (an inflammatory biomarker) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from a representative sample of 4425 Chinese adults in Taiwan. The MetS was defined by a unified criteria set by several major organizations. A CKD event was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 2. Additionly, a CRP cutpoint of 3 mg/L was used to differentiate high and low CRP levels. Overall, 1000 participants had MetS, resulting in a prevalence rate of 22.6%. High CRP level was noted in 782 (17.6%) subjects. In addition, a total of 508 (11.5%) persons qualified as having CKD. Subjects with the MetS had 1.55-fold [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-2.32] increased odds of CKD compared with their counterparts without the MetS after multiple adjustments. In addition, there was a significantly graded relationship between increasing levels of serum CRP and prevalent CKD (p for trend = 0.001). Participants in the highest category of serum CRP had a significantly elevated odds of CKD as compared with those in the lowest category [odds ratio (OR), 1.60; 95% CI, 1.21-2.12]. However, there was no interaction in excess of additive scale between the presence of MetS and high CRP level (p = 0.83). These findings suggest that MetS and high CRP were independently associated with increased prevalence of CKD in Chinese adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)94-98
Number of pages5
JournalEndocrine Research
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Chronic Renal Insufficiency
C-Reactive Protein
Confidence Intervals
Serum
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Taiwan
Cross-Sectional Studies
Biomarkers
Odds Ratio
Organizations
Inflammation
Phenotype

Keywords

  • C-reactive protein
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Inflammation
  • Metabolic syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Yang, T., Chou, Y. C., Chu, C. H., Lin, S. H., Hsieh, P. C., Hsu, C. H., ... Sun, C. A. (2014). Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein concentration as independent correlates of chronic kidney disease. Endocrine Research, 39(3), 94-98. https://doi.org/10.3109/07435800.2013.840652

Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein concentration as independent correlates of chronic kidney disease. / Yang, Tsan; Chou, Yu Ching; Chu, Chi Hong; Lin, Shih H.; Hsieh, Po Chien; Hsu, Chih Hsung; Bai, Chyi-Huey; You, San Lin; Sun, Chien An.

In: Endocrine Research, Vol. 39, No. 3, 2014, p. 94-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yang, Tsan ; Chou, Yu Ching ; Chu, Chi Hong ; Lin, Shih H. ; Hsieh, Po Chien ; Hsu, Chih Hsung ; Bai, Chyi-Huey ; You, San Lin ; Sun, Chien An. / Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein concentration as independent correlates of chronic kidney disease. In: Endocrine Research. 2014 ; Vol. 39, No. 3. pp. 94-98.
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