Mental adjustment at different phases in breast cancer trajectory: Re-examination of factor structure of the Mini-MAC and its correlation with distress

Wei Ting Wang, Pei Chiung Tu, Tse Jia Liu, Dah Cherng Yeh, Wen Yau Hsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective The aim of this study is twofold. First, it aims to determine the factor structure of the Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer (Mini-MAC) Scale by using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to compare the three-factor, four-factor, and five-factor structures among 340 Taiwanese breast cancer patients. Second, it aims to test the difference in the correlations of coping strategies and the outcome measures between two populations: one-month newly diagnosed and five-year long-term survival patients. Methods Two samples, composed of 142 newly diagnosed and 198 long-term survival breast cancer patients, were recruited. Cancer-specific coping and distress were assessed via the Mini-MAC Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), respectively. Results The CFA confirmed Watson's original five-factor structure fit the data best. The correlation difference between the two samples lies in the fighting spirit (FS), which correlated negatively with distress among the newly diagnosed sample but had no correlation among the long-term survivors. Moreover, fatalism (FA) was found to correlate positively with distress. Conclusions The five-factor structure represents a more psychometrically sound measure of psychological adjustment in the current data set. The findings also support the argument that the relationships between coping and distress vary, to some degree, at different phases in the cancer trajectory. FS is only a positive predictor of psychological adjustment among newly diagnosed patients. Because of the exclusion of two items, FA showed a positive correlation with distress, a result that contradicts previous findings. Further theoretical and practical implications for FS and FA are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)768-774
Number of pages7
JournalPsycho-Oncology
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013

Fingerprint

Social Adjustment
Breast Neoplasms
Statistical Factor Analysis
Neoplasms
Cancer Care Facilities
Survival
Survivors
Anxiety
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Depression
Population
Emotional Adjustment

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • confirmatory factor analysis
  • long-term survivor
  • Mini-MAC
  • newly diagnosed
  • oncology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Mental adjustment at different phases in breast cancer trajectory : Re-examination of factor structure of the Mini-MAC and its correlation with distress. / Wang, Wei Ting; Tu, Pei Chiung; Liu, Tse Jia; Yeh, Dah Cherng; Hsu, Wen Yau.

In: Psycho-Oncology, Vol. 22, No. 4, 04.2013, p. 768-774.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Wei Ting ; Tu, Pei Chiung ; Liu, Tse Jia ; Yeh, Dah Cherng ; Hsu, Wen Yau. / Mental adjustment at different phases in breast cancer trajectory : Re-examination of factor structure of the Mini-MAC and its correlation with distress. In: Psycho-Oncology. 2013 ; Vol. 22, No. 4. pp. 768-774.
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N2 - Objective The aim of this study is twofold. First, it aims to determine the factor structure of the Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer (Mini-MAC) Scale by using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to compare the three-factor, four-factor, and five-factor structures among 340 Taiwanese breast cancer patients. Second, it aims to test the difference in the correlations of coping strategies and the outcome measures between two populations: one-month newly diagnosed and five-year long-term survival patients. Methods Two samples, composed of 142 newly diagnosed and 198 long-term survival breast cancer patients, were recruited. Cancer-specific coping and distress were assessed via the Mini-MAC Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), respectively. Results The CFA confirmed Watson's original five-factor structure fit the data best. The correlation difference between the two samples lies in the fighting spirit (FS), which correlated negatively with distress among the newly diagnosed sample but had no correlation among the long-term survivors. Moreover, fatalism (FA) was found to correlate positively with distress. Conclusions The five-factor structure represents a more psychometrically sound measure of psychological adjustment in the current data set. The findings also support the argument that the relationships between coping and distress vary, to some degree, at different phases in the cancer trajectory. FS is only a positive predictor of psychological adjustment among newly diagnosed patients. Because of the exclusion of two items, FA showed a positive correlation with distress, a result that contradicts previous findings. Further theoretical and practical implications for FS and FA are discussed.

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