Abstract

The aim of this study was to explore the biophysical effects of static magnetic field on osteoblastic cells. MG63 cells were exposed to 0.25 and 0.4-T static magnetic fields (SMF). The cell cycle effects were tested by flow cytometry. The differentiation of the cells was assessed by detecting the changes in prostaglandin E2, osteocalcin, and extracellular matrix expression. Membrane fluidity was used to evaluate the alterations in the biophysical properties of cellular membranes after the SMF simulations. Our results show that SMF exposure increases prostaglandin E2 level and extracellular matrix express in MG63 cells. On the other hand, MG63 cells exposed to 0.4-T SMF exhibited a significant decrease in membrane fluidity at 8 h. Based on these findings, it appears reasonable to suggest that SMF affect osteoblastic maturation by increasing membrane rigidity and then inducing differentiation pathway.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-64
Number of pages10
JournalElectromagnetic Biology and Medicine
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2008

Fingerprint

Biophysics
biophysics
osteoblasts
Magnetic Fields
magnetic fields
Osteoblasts
membrane fluidity
Membrane Fluidity
cells
Dinoprostone
extracellular matrix
prostaglandins
Extracellular Matrix
osteocalcin
Membranes
Osteocalcin
cell differentiation
flow cytometry
Cell Differentiation
cell cycle

Keywords

  • Differentiation
  • Mechanobiology
  • Membrane fluidity
  • MG63
  • Osteoblast
  • Static magnetic field

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Mechanobiology of MG63 osteoblast-like cells adaptation to static magnetic forces. / Lin, Shu Li; Chang, Wei Jen; Chiu, Kang Hsuan; Hsieh, Sung Chih; Lee, Sheng Yang; Lin, Che Tong; Chen, Chang Chih; Huang, Haw Ming.

In: Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine, Vol. 27, No. 1, 03.2008, p. 55-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Lin, Shu Li

AU - Chang, Wei Jen

AU - Chiu, Kang Hsuan

AU - Hsieh, Sung Chih

AU - Lee, Sheng Yang

AU - Lin, Che Tong

AU - Chen, Chang Chih

AU - Huang, Haw Ming

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AB - The aim of this study was to explore the biophysical effects of static magnetic field on osteoblastic cells. MG63 cells were exposed to 0.25 and 0.4-T static magnetic fields (SMF). The cell cycle effects were tested by flow cytometry. The differentiation of the cells was assessed by detecting the changes in prostaglandin E2, osteocalcin, and extracellular matrix expression. Membrane fluidity was used to evaluate the alterations in the biophysical properties of cellular membranes after the SMF simulations. Our results show that SMF exposure increases prostaglandin E2 level and extracellular matrix express in MG63 cells. On the other hand, MG63 cells exposed to 0.4-T SMF exhibited a significant decrease in membrane fluidity at 8 h. Based on these findings, it appears reasonable to suggest that SMF affect osteoblastic maturation by increasing membrane rigidity and then inducing differentiation pathway.

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