Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow by stable xenon-enhanced computed tomography. Part I: Efficacy, normal values and adverse reactions in 40 normal Taiwan Chineses

H. M. Liu, Y. K. Tu, C. T. Su

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: By sequential computed tomography, nonradioactive xenon gas is inhaled and the temporal changes in radiographic enhancement produced by the inhalation are measured. Methods: Studies involving 5 minutes of mixed gas including 30% stable xenon,30% oxygen and 40% of room air inhalation were performed routinely in 40 awake volunteers and patients. Direct measurement of the expired xenon concentration and the use of computer-programmed formulas allowed accurate, reproducible measurement of regional cerebral blood flow and partition coefficients of small regions. Results: There was no definite significant side-to-side difference. The measurement were: 42.2ml/100g/minute ±6.5 in anterior anterior cerebral artery territory, 42.1ml/100g/minute ±6.2 in middle cerebral artery territory, 38.1ml/100g/minute ±4.3 in posterior cerebral artery territory, 55.5ml/100g/minute ±5.9 in putamen territory, and 61.4ml/100g/minute ±7.3 in thalamus territory. Adverse reactions such as respiratory delay, nausea, vomiting and headache were observed in 22.5% without permanent neurological deficit. Physiologic reactions of xenon gas such as lightheadedness, and emotional lability were found in 35% of patients. All of them became normal within 5 minutes after re-breathing of room-air after the procedures. Conclusion: Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow with xenon-CT is feasible and reproducible. The xenon/CT method appears to have several advantages over conventional cerebral blood flow measurement utilizing radionuclide techniques, and it can provide useful clinical and research information. Cerebral blood flow becomes less with the ages advanced in all the vascular territories in normal Chinese and this is compatible to the previous western reports.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)164-170
Number of pages7
JournalActa Neurologica Taiwanica
Volume6
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cerebrovascular Circulation
Xenon
Regional Blood Flow
Taiwan
Reference Values
Tomography
Gases
Inhalation
Air
Posterior Cerebral Artery
Anterior Cerebral Artery
Putamen
Middle Cerebral Artery
Dizziness
Thalamus
Radioisotopes
Nausea
Vomiting
Blood Vessels
Headache

Keywords

  • Cerebral blood flow
  • Human
  • Stable xenon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

@article{a7cc9e52e84a49f4a3f6118e9fd725e2,
title = "Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow by stable xenon-enhanced computed tomography. Part I: Efficacy, normal values and adverse reactions in 40 normal Taiwan Chineses",
abstract = "Background: By sequential computed tomography, nonradioactive xenon gas is inhaled and the temporal changes in radiographic enhancement produced by the inhalation are measured. Methods: Studies involving 5 minutes of mixed gas including 30{\%} stable xenon,30{\%} oxygen and 40{\%} of room air inhalation were performed routinely in 40 awake volunteers and patients. Direct measurement of the expired xenon concentration and the use of computer-programmed formulas allowed accurate, reproducible measurement of regional cerebral blood flow and partition coefficients of small regions. Results: There was no definite significant side-to-side difference. The measurement were: 42.2ml/100g/minute ±6.5 in anterior anterior cerebral artery territory, 42.1ml/100g/minute ±6.2 in middle cerebral artery territory, 38.1ml/100g/minute ±4.3 in posterior cerebral artery territory, 55.5ml/100g/minute ±5.9 in putamen territory, and 61.4ml/100g/minute ±7.3 in thalamus territory. Adverse reactions such as respiratory delay, nausea, vomiting and headache were observed in 22.5{\%} without permanent neurological deficit. Physiologic reactions of xenon gas such as lightheadedness, and emotional lability were found in 35{\%} of patients. All of them became normal within 5 minutes after re-breathing of room-air after the procedures. Conclusion: Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow with xenon-CT is feasible and reproducible. The xenon/CT method appears to have several advantages over conventional cerebral blood flow measurement utilizing radionuclide techniques, and it can provide useful clinical and research information. Cerebral blood flow becomes less with the ages advanced in all the vascular territories in normal Chinese and this is compatible to the previous western reports.",
keywords = "Cerebral blood flow, Human, Stable xenon",
author = "Liu, {H. M.} and Tu, {Y. K.} and Su, {C. T.}",
year = "1997",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "164--170",
journal = "Acta Neurologica Taiwanica",
issn = "1019-6099",
publisher = "Taiwan Neurological Society",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow by stable xenon-enhanced computed tomography. Part I

T2 - Efficacy, normal values and adverse reactions in 40 normal Taiwan Chineses

AU - Liu, H. M.

AU - Tu, Y. K.

AU - Su, C. T.

PY - 1997/12/1

Y1 - 1997/12/1

N2 - Background: By sequential computed tomography, nonradioactive xenon gas is inhaled and the temporal changes in radiographic enhancement produced by the inhalation are measured. Methods: Studies involving 5 minutes of mixed gas including 30% stable xenon,30% oxygen and 40% of room air inhalation were performed routinely in 40 awake volunteers and patients. Direct measurement of the expired xenon concentration and the use of computer-programmed formulas allowed accurate, reproducible measurement of regional cerebral blood flow and partition coefficients of small regions. Results: There was no definite significant side-to-side difference. The measurement were: 42.2ml/100g/minute ±6.5 in anterior anterior cerebral artery territory, 42.1ml/100g/minute ±6.2 in middle cerebral artery territory, 38.1ml/100g/minute ±4.3 in posterior cerebral artery territory, 55.5ml/100g/minute ±5.9 in putamen territory, and 61.4ml/100g/minute ±7.3 in thalamus territory. Adverse reactions such as respiratory delay, nausea, vomiting and headache were observed in 22.5% without permanent neurological deficit. Physiologic reactions of xenon gas such as lightheadedness, and emotional lability were found in 35% of patients. All of them became normal within 5 minutes after re-breathing of room-air after the procedures. Conclusion: Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow with xenon-CT is feasible and reproducible. The xenon/CT method appears to have several advantages over conventional cerebral blood flow measurement utilizing radionuclide techniques, and it can provide useful clinical and research information. Cerebral blood flow becomes less with the ages advanced in all the vascular territories in normal Chinese and this is compatible to the previous western reports.

AB - Background: By sequential computed tomography, nonradioactive xenon gas is inhaled and the temporal changes in radiographic enhancement produced by the inhalation are measured. Methods: Studies involving 5 minutes of mixed gas including 30% stable xenon,30% oxygen and 40% of room air inhalation were performed routinely in 40 awake volunteers and patients. Direct measurement of the expired xenon concentration and the use of computer-programmed formulas allowed accurate, reproducible measurement of regional cerebral blood flow and partition coefficients of small regions. Results: There was no definite significant side-to-side difference. The measurement were: 42.2ml/100g/minute ±6.5 in anterior anterior cerebral artery territory, 42.1ml/100g/minute ±6.2 in middle cerebral artery territory, 38.1ml/100g/minute ±4.3 in posterior cerebral artery territory, 55.5ml/100g/minute ±5.9 in putamen territory, and 61.4ml/100g/minute ±7.3 in thalamus territory. Adverse reactions such as respiratory delay, nausea, vomiting and headache were observed in 22.5% without permanent neurological deficit. Physiologic reactions of xenon gas such as lightheadedness, and emotional lability were found in 35% of patients. All of them became normal within 5 minutes after re-breathing of room-air after the procedures. Conclusion: Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow with xenon-CT is feasible and reproducible. The xenon/CT method appears to have several advantages over conventional cerebral blood flow measurement utilizing radionuclide techniques, and it can provide useful clinical and research information. Cerebral blood flow becomes less with the ages advanced in all the vascular territories in normal Chinese and this is compatible to the previous western reports.

KW - Cerebral blood flow

KW - Human

KW - Stable xenon

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031458819&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031458819&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0031458819

VL - 6

SP - 164

EP - 170

JO - Acta Neurologica Taiwanica

JF - Acta Neurologica Taiwanica

SN - 1019-6099

IS - 2

ER -