Abstract

The physiological changes in endometriosis involving multiple steps of matrix remodeling include abnormal tissue growth, invasion, and adhesion formation. Endometriosis-associated abnormal matrix remodeling is affected by several molecular factors including proteolytic enzymes and their inhibitors, which mediate tissue turnover throughout the reproductive tract to maintain the integrity of the endometrium, and ovarian steroids, which normally regulate reconstruction and breakdown of endometrium in the menstrual cycle. In addition, various growth factors, such as platelet-derived growth factor, transform growth factor β, and epidermal growth factor, direct modulation of growth, activation, and chemotaxis which may facilitate endometrial cell adhesion onto the peritoneal mesothelium during the development of endometriosis. Furthermore, cell adhesion molecules are believed to be critically involved in most cellular-level processes including cellular differentiation, motility, and attachment with the extracellular matrix. The present review focuses on the abnormal matrix remodeling process and its possible regulatory mechanism in association with endometriosis development. As a greater understanding of the cause of endometriosis is achieved, better treatment of the disease and its prevention become possible.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)93-99
Number of pages7
JournalReproductive Medicine and Biology
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2005

Fingerprint

Endometriosis
Endometrium
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Platelet-Derived Growth Factor
Cell Adhesion Molecules
Enzyme Inhibitors
Chemotaxis
Menstrual Cycle
Growth
Epidermal Growth Factor
Cell Adhesion
Extracellular Matrix
Peptide Hydrolases
Epithelium
Steroids

Keywords

  • Endometriosis
  • Extracellular matrix
  • Matrix metalloprotease
  • Matrix remodeling
  • Tissue inhibitors for matrix metalloprotease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Physiology

Cite this

Matrix remodeling and endometriosis. / Yang, Wei Chung Vivian; Au, Heng Kien; Chang, Ching Wen; Chen, Huei Wen; Chen, Pi Hua; Chen, Chieh Cheng; Tang, Yun Long; Wang, I. Te; Tzeng, Chii Ruey.

In: Reproductive Medicine and Biology, Vol. 4, No. 2, 06.2005, p. 93-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yang, WCV, Au, HK, Chang, CW, Chen, HW, Chen, PH, Chen, CC, Tang, YL, Wang, IT & Tzeng, CR 2005, 'Matrix remodeling and endometriosis', Reproductive Medicine and Biology, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 93-99. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1447-0578.2005.00098.x
Yang, Wei Chung Vivian ; Au, Heng Kien ; Chang, Ching Wen ; Chen, Huei Wen ; Chen, Pi Hua ; Chen, Chieh Cheng ; Tang, Yun Long ; Wang, I. Te ; Tzeng, Chii Ruey. / Matrix remodeling and endometriosis. In: Reproductive Medicine and Biology. 2005 ; Vol. 4, No. 2. pp. 93-99.
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