Matrix metalloproteinase-9 production following cardiopulmonary bypass was not associated with pulmonary dysfunction after cardiac surgery

Tso Chou Lin, Feng Yen Lin, Yi Wen Lin, Che Hao Hsu, Go Shine Huang, Zhi Fu Wu, Yi Ting Tsai, Chih Yuan Lin, Chi Yuan Li, Chien Sung Tsai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) causes release of matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) 9, contributing to pulmonary infiltration and dysfunction. The aims were to investigate MMP-9 production and associated perioperative variables and oxygenation following CPB. Methods. Thirty patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery were included. Arterial blood was sampled at 6 sequential points (before anesthesia induction, before CPB and at 2, 4, 6, and 24 h after beginning CPB) for plasma MMP-9 concentrations by ELISA. The perioperative laboratory data and variables, including bypass time, PaO2/FiO2, and extubation time, were also recorded. Results. The plasma MMP-9 concentrations significantly elevated at 2-6 h after beginning CPB (P <0.001) and returned to the preanesthesia level at 24 h (P = 0.23), with predominant neutrophil counts after surgery (P <0.001). The plasma MMP-9 levels at 4 and 6 h were not correlated with prolonged CPB time and displayed no association with postoperative PaO2/FiO2, regardless of reduced ratio from preoperative 342.9 ± 81.2 to postoperative 207.3 ± 121.3 mmHg (P <0.001). Conclusion. Elective cardiac surgery with CPB induced short-term elevation of plasma MMP-9 concentrations within 24 hours, however, without significant correlation with CPB time and postoperative pulmonary dysfunction, despite predominantly increased neutrophils and reduced oxygenation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number341740
JournalMediators of Inflammation
Volume2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Cell Biology

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