Maternal request CS-Role of hospital teaching status and for-profit ownership

Sudha Xirasagar, Herng Ching Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine whether hospitals' for-profit (FP) ownership and non-teaching status are associated with greater likelihood of maternal request cesarean (CS) relative to public and not-for-profit (NFP) and teaching status, respectively. Method: Retrospective, cross-sectional, population-based study of Taiwan's National Health Insurance claims data, covering all 739,531 vaginal delivery-eligible singleton deliveries during 1997-2000, using multiple logistic regression analyses. Results: Adjusted for maternal age and geographic location, FP district hospitals (almost all non-teaching), followed by ob/gyn clinics were significantly more likely to perform request CS (OR = 3.5-2.3) than public and NFP teaching hospitals. Among non-teaching and teaching hospitals, FPs were more likely to perform request CS than public and NFP hospitals (OR = 2.3 and 2.5, respectively). Conclusions: Our findings are consistent with greater propensity of physicians in FP institutions to accommodate patient requests involving revenue-maximizing procedures such as request CS. This effect is moderated by teaching hospitals' preference for complicated cases, consistent with their teaching mission and hi-tech infrastructure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-34
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Obstetrics Gynecology and Reproductive Biology
Volume132
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2007

Fingerprint

Ownership
Teaching Hospitals
Mothers
Teaching
Geographic Locations
District Hospitals
Maternal Age
National Health Programs
Taiwan
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Physicians
Population

Keywords

  • Hospital ownership
  • Request cesarean section
  • Teaching status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Reproductive Medicine

Cite this

Maternal request CS-Role of hospital teaching status and for-profit ownership. / Xirasagar, Sudha; Lin, Herng Ching.

In: European Journal of Obstetrics Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Vol. 132, No. 1, 05.2007, p. 27-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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