Maternal inflammation exacerbates neonatal hyperoxia-induced kidney injury in rat offspring

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Preclinical studies have demonstrated that maternal inflammation or neonatal hyperoxia adversely affects kidney maturation. This study explored whether prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure can augment neonatal hyperoxia-induced kidney injury. Methods: Pregnant Sprague–Dawley rats received intraperitoneal injections of LPS (0.5 mg/kg) in normal saline (NS) or NS on 20 and 21 days of gestation. The pups were reared in room air (RA) or 2 weeks of 85% O2, creating the four study groups, NS + RA, NS + O2, LPS + RA, and LPS + O2. Kidneys were taken for oxidase stress and histological analyses. Results: The rats exposed to maternal LPS or neonatal hyperoxia exhibited significantly higher kidney injury score, lower glomerular number, higher toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) expressions, and higher MPO activity compared with the rats exposed to maternal NS and neonatal RA. The rats exposed to both maternal LPS and neonatal hyperoxia exhibited significantly lower glomerular number, higher kidney injury score, TLR4, MPO, and 8-OHdG expressions compared with the rats exposed to maternal LPS or neonatal hyperoxia. Conclusion: Maternal inflammation exacerbates neonatal hyperoxia-induced kidney injury and the underlying mechanism may be related to activation of TLR4 and increased oxidative stress.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)174-180
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Research
Volume86
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2019

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Hyperoxia
Lipopolysaccharides
Mothers
Inflammation
Kidney
Wounds and Injuries
Toll-Like Receptor 4
Toll-Like Receptor 8
Air
Peroxidase
Intraperitoneal Injections
Oxidoreductases
Oxidative Stress
Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Maternal inflammation exacerbates neonatal hyperoxia-induced kidney injury in rat offspring. / Chen, Chung Ming; Chou, Hsiu Chu.

In: Pediatric Research, Vol. 86, No. 2, 01.08.2019, p. 174-180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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