Lower urinary tract symptoms and urinary flow rates in female patients with hyperthyroidism

Chen Hsun Ho, Tien Chun Chang, Ya Jun Guo, Shyh Chyan Chen, Hong Jeng Yu, Kuo How Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To investigate lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and voiding function in a cohort of hyperthyroid women. The autonomic nervous system (ANS) imbalance has been thought to cause LUTS in hyperthyroidism. Methods: Between January 2008 and December 2008, 65 newly diagnosed, untreated female hyperthyroid patients were enrolled in this study. Another 62 age-matched healthy women were enrolled as a control group. Demographics, LUTS, urinary flow rates, hyperthyroid symptoms, and serum levels of thyroid hormones were recorded before and after the medical treatment for hyperthyroidism. Results: Compared with the control group, the hyperthyroid patients had a higher mean symptom score of frequency (1.15 ± 1.75 vs 0.31 ± 1.05, P = .01), incomplete emptying (0.91 ± 1.47 vs 0.29 ± 1.12, P = .02), straining (1.05 ± 0.85 vs 0.27 ± 0.51, P <.01), voiding symptoms (3.05 ± 3.28 vs 1.06 ± 2.63, P <.01), and total symptoms (5.88 ± 6.17 vs 2.76 ± 4.65, P <.01). Fifty-three (81.5%) of them had an IPSS of <8, while only 12 (18.5%) had an International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) of <8. Hyperthyroid women demonstrated a lower mean peak flow rate (25.0 ± 5.3 vs 28.6 ± 6.1 mL/s, P = .02). After treatment, both LUTS and flow rates improved significantly. The severity of LUTS was associated with neither serum levels of thyroid hormone nor other hyperthyroid symptoms. Conclusions: Hyperthyroid women have worse LUTS and lower peak flow rates than healthy controls. However, the severity of LUTS is only mild (IPSS <8) in the majority, and only 18.5% have moderate-to-severe LUTS. Both LUTS and flow rates improve after the treatment for hyperthyroidism. The exact mechanisms of LUTS and/or lower urinary tract dysfunction in hyperthyroidism require further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)50-54
Number of pages5
JournalUrology
Volume77
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2011

Fingerprint

Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms
Hyperthyroidism
Prostate
Thyroid Hormones
Control Groups
Autonomic Nervous System
Serum
Urinary Tract
Therapeutics
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Lower urinary tract symptoms and urinary flow rates in female patients with hyperthyroidism. / Ho, Chen Hsun; Chang, Tien Chun; Guo, Ya Jun; Chen, Shyh Chyan; Yu, Hong Jeng; Huang, Kuo How.

In: Urology, Vol. 77, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 50-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ho, Chen Hsun ; Chang, Tien Chun ; Guo, Ya Jun ; Chen, Shyh Chyan ; Yu, Hong Jeng ; Huang, Kuo How. / Lower urinary tract symptoms and urinary flow rates in female patients with hyperthyroidism. In: Urology. 2011 ; Vol. 77, No. 1. pp. 50-54.
@article{bdb50f83ce684deebe15eedbe3c32421,
title = "Lower urinary tract symptoms and urinary flow rates in female patients with hyperthyroidism",
abstract = "Objectives: To investigate lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and voiding function in a cohort of hyperthyroid women. The autonomic nervous system (ANS) imbalance has been thought to cause LUTS in hyperthyroidism. Methods: Between January 2008 and December 2008, 65 newly diagnosed, untreated female hyperthyroid patients were enrolled in this study. Another 62 age-matched healthy women were enrolled as a control group. Demographics, LUTS, urinary flow rates, hyperthyroid symptoms, and serum levels of thyroid hormones were recorded before and after the medical treatment for hyperthyroidism. Results: Compared with the control group, the hyperthyroid patients had a higher mean symptom score of frequency (1.15 ± 1.75 vs 0.31 ± 1.05, P = .01), incomplete emptying (0.91 ± 1.47 vs 0.29 ± 1.12, P = .02), straining (1.05 ± 0.85 vs 0.27 ± 0.51, P <.01), voiding symptoms (3.05 ± 3.28 vs 1.06 ± 2.63, P <.01), and total symptoms (5.88 ± 6.17 vs 2.76 ± 4.65, P <.01). Fifty-three (81.5{\%}) of them had an IPSS of <8, while only 12 (18.5{\%}) had an International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) of <8. Hyperthyroid women demonstrated a lower mean peak flow rate (25.0 ± 5.3 vs 28.6 ± 6.1 mL/s, P = .02). After treatment, both LUTS and flow rates improved significantly. The severity of LUTS was associated with neither serum levels of thyroid hormone nor other hyperthyroid symptoms. Conclusions: Hyperthyroid women have worse LUTS and lower peak flow rates than healthy controls. However, the severity of LUTS is only mild (IPSS <8) in the majority, and only 18.5{\%} have moderate-to-severe LUTS. Both LUTS and flow rates improve after the treatment for hyperthyroidism. The exact mechanisms of LUTS and/or lower urinary tract dysfunction in hyperthyroidism require further investigation.",
author = "Ho, {Chen Hsun} and Chang, {Tien Chun} and Guo, {Ya Jun} and Chen, {Shyh Chyan} and Yu, {Hong Jeng} and Huang, {Kuo How}",
year = "2011",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.urology.2010.07.479",
language = "English",
volume = "77",
pages = "50--54",
journal = "Urology",
issn = "0090-4295",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lower urinary tract symptoms and urinary flow rates in female patients with hyperthyroidism

AU - Ho, Chen Hsun

AU - Chang, Tien Chun

AU - Guo, Ya Jun

AU - Chen, Shyh Chyan

AU - Yu, Hong Jeng

AU - Huang, Kuo How

PY - 2011/1/1

Y1 - 2011/1/1

N2 - Objectives: To investigate lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and voiding function in a cohort of hyperthyroid women. The autonomic nervous system (ANS) imbalance has been thought to cause LUTS in hyperthyroidism. Methods: Between January 2008 and December 2008, 65 newly diagnosed, untreated female hyperthyroid patients were enrolled in this study. Another 62 age-matched healthy women were enrolled as a control group. Demographics, LUTS, urinary flow rates, hyperthyroid symptoms, and serum levels of thyroid hormones were recorded before and after the medical treatment for hyperthyroidism. Results: Compared with the control group, the hyperthyroid patients had a higher mean symptom score of frequency (1.15 ± 1.75 vs 0.31 ± 1.05, P = .01), incomplete emptying (0.91 ± 1.47 vs 0.29 ± 1.12, P = .02), straining (1.05 ± 0.85 vs 0.27 ± 0.51, P <.01), voiding symptoms (3.05 ± 3.28 vs 1.06 ± 2.63, P <.01), and total symptoms (5.88 ± 6.17 vs 2.76 ± 4.65, P <.01). Fifty-three (81.5%) of them had an IPSS of <8, while only 12 (18.5%) had an International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) of <8. Hyperthyroid women demonstrated a lower mean peak flow rate (25.0 ± 5.3 vs 28.6 ± 6.1 mL/s, P = .02). After treatment, both LUTS and flow rates improved significantly. The severity of LUTS was associated with neither serum levels of thyroid hormone nor other hyperthyroid symptoms. Conclusions: Hyperthyroid women have worse LUTS and lower peak flow rates than healthy controls. However, the severity of LUTS is only mild (IPSS <8) in the majority, and only 18.5% have moderate-to-severe LUTS. Both LUTS and flow rates improve after the treatment for hyperthyroidism. The exact mechanisms of LUTS and/or lower urinary tract dysfunction in hyperthyroidism require further investigation.

AB - Objectives: To investigate lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and voiding function in a cohort of hyperthyroid women. The autonomic nervous system (ANS) imbalance has been thought to cause LUTS in hyperthyroidism. Methods: Between January 2008 and December 2008, 65 newly diagnosed, untreated female hyperthyroid patients were enrolled in this study. Another 62 age-matched healthy women were enrolled as a control group. Demographics, LUTS, urinary flow rates, hyperthyroid symptoms, and serum levels of thyroid hormones were recorded before and after the medical treatment for hyperthyroidism. Results: Compared with the control group, the hyperthyroid patients had a higher mean symptom score of frequency (1.15 ± 1.75 vs 0.31 ± 1.05, P = .01), incomplete emptying (0.91 ± 1.47 vs 0.29 ± 1.12, P = .02), straining (1.05 ± 0.85 vs 0.27 ± 0.51, P <.01), voiding symptoms (3.05 ± 3.28 vs 1.06 ± 2.63, P <.01), and total symptoms (5.88 ± 6.17 vs 2.76 ± 4.65, P <.01). Fifty-three (81.5%) of them had an IPSS of <8, while only 12 (18.5%) had an International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) of <8. Hyperthyroid women demonstrated a lower mean peak flow rate (25.0 ± 5.3 vs 28.6 ± 6.1 mL/s, P = .02). After treatment, both LUTS and flow rates improved significantly. The severity of LUTS was associated with neither serum levels of thyroid hormone nor other hyperthyroid symptoms. Conclusions: Hyperthyroid women have worse LUTS and lower peak flow rates than healthy controls. However, the severity of LUTS is only mild (IPSS <8) in the majority, and only 18.5% have moderate-to-severe LUTS. Both LUTS and flow rates improve after the treatment for hyperthyroidism. The exact mechanisms of LUTS and/or lower urinary tract dysfunction in hyperthyroidism require further investigation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78650912415&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78650912415&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.urology.2010.07.479

DO - 10.1016/j.urology.2010.07.479

M3 - Article

VL - 77

SP - 50

EP - 54

JO - Urology

JF - Urology

SN - 0090-4295

IS - 1

ER -