Low maternal serum levels of placenta growth factor as an antecedent of clinical preeclampsia

S. Craig Tidwell, Hong Nerng Ho, Wen Hsin Chiu, Ronald J. Torry, Donald S. Torry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

187 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Maternal serum placenta growth factor levels have been shown to be significantly reduced in women with established preeclampsia. However, the temporal change in serum placenta growth factor levels before the clinical onset of preeclampsia is not known. STUDY DESIGN: Serum samples were collected from patients at the first prenatal (5-15 weeks' gestation), second-trimester (16-20 weeks' gestation), and third-trimester (26-30 weeks' gestation) visits. Serum placenta growth factor levels were determined and analyzed according to pregnancy outcome. RESULTS: Maternal placenta growth factor levels during normal gestation increased dramatically from the first to the third trimester. At the same gestational time points, in contrast, significantly lower serum placenta growth factor levels were found in patients in whom mild or severe preeclampsia eventually developed (P < .01). Low maternal serum placenta growth factor levels during early gestation were associated with a significant odds ratio for development of preeclampsia (P < .005). CONCLUSION: Relatively decreased levels of serum placenta growth factor occur before the onset of clinical preeclampsia, which suggests that placenta growth factor measurement could be used to discriminate those pregnancies predisposed to development of preeclampsia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1267-1272
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume184
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Placenta growth factor
  • Preeclampsia
  • Pregnancy
  • Trophoblast

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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