Library self-service

Predicting user intentions related to self-issue and return systems

Kuochung Chang, Chiao Chen Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose - This paper aims to compare the effectiveness of the theory of planned behavior (TPB), the technology acceptance model (TAM) and the integrated TPB/TAM model to understand acceptance of library self-issue and return systems. Design/methodology/approach - The study data come from a non-random convenience sample of 266 undergraduate students, age 18-25. A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted using AMOS 17.0 to identify causal relationships. Findings - Findings show that the TPB/TAM integrated model is superior to the TPB and the TAM alone in terms of the ability to explain user acceptance of self-issue and return systems. Although subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and perceived usefulness have direct positive relationships to behavioral intention to use self-issue and return systems, attitude plays the most important role in explaining the intention to use self-issue and return systems. Research limitations/implications - The study assesses self-reported behavioral intention as part of the survey and, as a result, could have introduced inaccuracies. Practical implications - Librarians should reinforce the efficiency of self-issue and return systems to influence customers' willingness to use such systems. Originality/value - Little has been written on the intention to use self-issue and return systems. The three models are novel and usable in predicting the intention of self-issue and return systems, and the findings may also be generally applicable to librarians, users, and information systems professionals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)938-949
Number of pages12
JournalElectronic Library
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 13 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

acceptance
librarian
behavioral norm
Factor analysis
Information systems
factor analysis
information system
Students
customer
efficiency
methodology
ability
Values
student

Keywords

  • Consumer behaviour
  • Library users
  • Returns
  • Self-service
  • Taiwan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

Library self-service : Predicting user intentions related to self-issue and return systems. / Chang, Kuochung; Chang, Chiao Chen.

In: Electronic Library, Vol. 27, No. 6, 13.11.2009, p. 938-949.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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