Level of transforming growth factor beta 1 is elevated in cerebrospinal fluid of children with acute bacterial meningitis

Chao Ching Huang, Ying Chao Chang, Nan Haw Chow, Shan Tair Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated the levels of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in children with meningitis, with a view to prognostic relevance. CSF TGF-β1 levels on admission were measured by a sandwich enzyme immunoassay in children with bacterial meningitis (n = 16), aseptic meningitis (n = 12), and control subjects without evidence of central nervous system (CNS) infection (n = 16). Patients were followed up for a mean duration of 13 months, and neurodevelopmental sequelae was determined for those with bacterial meningitis. On admission, CSF TGF-β1 levels were significantly higher in children with bacterial meningitis (mean, standard error, 32.92, 2.36 pg/ml) as opposed to those with aseptic meningitis (25.26, 1.72 pg/ml) (P = 0.0155), or control subjects (20.53, 1.05 pg/ml) (P <0.0001). The CSF TGF-β1 levels in children with aseptic meningitis were higher than those in the control group, but without significance (P = 0.02). No apparent correlation existed between CSF TGF-β1 levels and CSF protein or cell counts in patients with bacterial meningitis. No significant difference in CSF TGF-β1 levels was found between patients with or without major sequelae following bacterial meningitis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)634-638
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neurology
Volume244
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bacterial Meningitides
Transforming Growth Factor beta
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Aseptic Meningitis
Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteins
Central Nervous System Infections
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Meningitis
Cell Count
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Bacterial meningitis
  • Cerebrospinal fluid
  • Transforming growth factor beta 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Level of transforming growth factor beta 1 is elevated in cerebrospinal fluid of children with acute bacterial meningitis. / Huang, Chao Ching; Chang, Ying Chao; Chow, Nan Haw; Wang, Shan Tair.

In: Journal of Neurology, Vol. 244, No. 10, 1997, p. 634-638.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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