Abstract

A laser thermoacoustic technique was innovated to evaluate laser-induced acoustic emissions (AEs) in experimental dental composites aged with 75% ethanol solution. Experimental composite systems of 75/25 BisGMA/TEGDMA resin filled with 0, 12.6, 30.0, and 56.5vol% of 8-μm silanized and unsilanized BaSiO6 were analyzed. The sample size was 4.65mm (diameter)x0.5mm (thick). Aging effects of immersing in 75% ethanol for up to 14h on AEs were then evaluated. A continuous-wave CO2 laser was used to heat the samples. Acoustic emissions were collected as a function of filler fraction, laser power, silanization, and immersion time. Onset of burst-pattern acoustic signals characteristic of fracturing occurred at different laser powers for different tested groups. Acoustic emissions generally increased with laser power, in which lower laser powers produced low-amplitude (45-50 dB) signals; the amplitude distribution (50-85 dB) became more extensive as laser powers increased. After immersion, the lower laser powers could produce the same phenomenon. The higher the filler fraction, the fewer AEs generated. A large percentage AE reduction due to silanization was noted as a function of filler fraction. Unsilanized specimens showed more thermal damages than did silanized ones. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. A laser thermoacoustic technique was innovated to evaluate laser-induced acoustic emissions (AEs) in experimental dental composites aged with 75% ethanol solution. Experimental composite systems of 75/25 BisGMA/TEGDMA resin filled with 0, 12.6, 30.0, and 56.5 vol% of 8-μm silanized and unsilanized BaSiO6 were analyzed. The sample size was 4.65 mm (diameter)×0.5 mm (thick). Aging effects of immersing in 75% ethanol for up to 14 h on AEs were then evaluated. A continuous-wave CO2 laser was used to heat the samples. Acoustic emissions were collected as a function of filler fraction, laser power, silanization, and immersion time. Onset of burst-pattern acoustic signals characteristic of fracturing occurred at different laser powers for different tested groups. Acoustic emissions generally increased with laser power, in which lower laser powers produced low-amplitude (45-50 dB) signals; the amplitude distribution (50-85 dB) became more extensive as laser powers increased. After immersion, the lower laser powers could produce the same phenomenon. The higher the filler fraction, the fewer AEs generated. A large percentage AE reduction due to silanization was noted as a function of filler fraction. Unsilanized specimens showed more thermal damages than did silanized ones.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1399-1408
Number of pages10
JournalBiomaterials
Volume21
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Keywords

  • Acoustic emissions
  • Dental composites
  • Laser
  • Silanization
  • Barium compounds
  • Carbon dioxide lasers
  • Continuous wave lasers
  • Laser beam effects
  • Plastics fillers
  • Reinforced plastics
  • Laser-induced acoustic emissions
  • camphorquinone
  • filler
  • methacrylic acid dimethylaminoethyl ester
  • polymer
  • resin cement
  • silicate
  • triethylene glycol dimethacrylate
  • unclassified drug
  • article
  • carbon dioxide laser
  • drug analysis
  • drug formulation
  • evoked auditory response
  • in vitro study
  • materials testing
  • priority journal
  • technique
  • Acoustics
  • Barium Compounds
  • Composite Resins
  • Equipment Design
  • Ethanol
  • Heat
  • Immersion
  • Lasers
  • Materials Testing
  • Microspheres
  • Silicates

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