Lactation inhibits hippocampal and cortical activation of cFos expression by nivida but not kainate receptor agonists

Rula Abbud, Wen Sen Lee, Gloria Hoffman, M. Susan Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lactation in the rat activates afferent neuronal pathways that cause marked changes in hormone secretion and maternal behavior. Previously, we used excitatory amino acids (EAAs) to challenge the neuroendocrine axis of the lactating rat and showed altered hypothalamic responsiveness to EAAs. In conducting those studies, we noted that the typical hyperactive behavior associated with NMA (N-methyl-d,l-aspartate) treatment was completely absent in lactating animals. In these studies we have examined the effects of lactation on cortical responsiveness to EAAs by using cFos expression as a marker of neuronal activation. Lactation inhibited hippocampal and cortical cFos induction in response to NMA, which was consistent with the absence of behavioral responses. However, NMA responsiveness was observed in other areas of the brain. Recovery of cortical activation in response to NMA was not observed until 24 h after removal of the suckling stimulus. In contrast, treatment with kainate (an agonist for a different type of glutamate receptor) induced similar patterns of cFos expression and behavioral responses (wet-dog shakes) in cycling and lactating rats. These data demonstrate that lactation, a physiological condition, can inhibit cortical activation that is mediated by NMDA but not kainate receptors. In so doing, lactation represents a novel model system in which to study mechanisms of NMDA receptor inactivation and subsequent consequences on hippocampal and cortical function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)244-250
Number of pages7
JournalMolecular and Cellular Neuroscience
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Kainic Acid Receptors
Lactation
Aspartic Acid
Excitatory Amino Acids
Afferent Pathways
Maternal Behavior
Kainic Acid
Glutamate Receptors
N-Methylaspartate
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
Hormones
Dogs
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Cite this

Lactation inhibits hippocampal and cortical activation of cFos expression by nivida but not kainate receptor agonists. / Abbud, Rula; Lee, Wen Sen; Hoffman, Gloria; Smith, M. Susan.

In: Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, Vol. 3, No. 3, 1992, p. 244-250.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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