Kefir improves fatty liver syndrome by inhibiting the lipogenesis pathway in leptin-deficient ob/ob knockout mice

H. L. Chen, Y. T. Tung, C. L. Tsai, C. W. Lai, Z. L. Lai, H. C. Tsai, Y. L. Lin, C. H. Wang, C. M. Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective:Fatty liver disease is commonly associated with obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. Severe fatty liver is sometimes accompanied by steatohepatitis and may lead to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. At present, there is no effective treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); thus, recent investigations have focused on developing effective therapeutics to treat this condition. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of kefir on the hepatic lipid metabolism of ob/ob mice, which are commonly used to model fatty liver disease.Results:In this study, we used leptin receptor-deficient ob/ob mice as an animal disease model of NAFLD. Six-week-old ob/ob mice were orally administered the dairy product kefir (140 mg kg-1 of body weight (BW) per day) for 4 weeks. The data demonstrated that kefir improved fatty liver syndrome on BW, energy expenditure and basal metabolic rate by inhibiting serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) activities (P<0.05) and by decreasing the triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) contents of the liver (P<0.05). Oral kefir administration also significantly reduced the macrovesicular fat quantity in liver tissue. In addition, kefir markedly decreased the expression of the genes sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) (P<0.05) but not the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) or hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1α (CPT1α) in the livers of ob/ob mice.Conclusion:On the basis of these results, we conclude that kefir improves NAFLD on BW, energy expenditure and basal metabolic rate by inhibiting the lipogenesis pathway and that kefir may have the potential for clinical application to the prevention or treatment of NAFLD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1172-1179
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume38
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 11 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lipogenesis
Fatty Liver
Leptin
Knockout Mice
Liver
Basal Metabolism
Body Weight
Transaminases
Energy Metabolism
Liver Diseases
Glutamic Acid
Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1
Carnitine O-Palmitoyltransferase
Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase
Animal Disease Models
Leptin Receptors
Oxaloacetic Acid
Fatty Acid Synthases
Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors
Dairy Products

Keywords

  • kefir
  • leptin-deficient ob/ob mice
  • lipid oxidative pathway
  • lipogenesis pathway
  • non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Kefir improves fatty liver syndrome by inhibiting the lipogenesis pathway in leptin-deficient ob/ob knockout mice. / Chen, H. L.; Tung, Y. T.; Tsai, C. L.; Lai, C. W.; Lai, Z. L.; Tsai, H. C.; Lin, Y. L.; Wang, C. H.; Chen, C. M.

In: International Journal of Obesity, Vol. 38, No. 9, 11.09.2014, p. 1172-1179.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, H. L. ; Tung, Y. T. ; Tsai, C. L. ; Lai, C. W. ; Lai, Z. L. ; Tsai, H. C. ; Lin, Y. L. ; Wang, C. H. ; Chen, C. M. / Kefir improves fatty liver syndrome by inhibiting the lipogenesis pathway in leptin-deficient ob/ob knockout mice. In: International Journal of Obesity. 2014 ; Vol. 38, No. 9. pp. 1172-1179.
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AU - Lai, Z. L.

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AB - Objective:Fatty liver disease is commonly associated with obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. Severe fatty liver is sometimes accompanied by steatohepatitis and may lead to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. At present, there is no effective treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); thus, recent investigations have focused on developing effective therapeutics to treat this condition. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of kefir on the hepatic lipid metabolism of ob/ob mice, which are commonly used to model fatty liver disease.Results:In this study, we used leptin receptor-deficient ob/ob mice as an animal disease model of NAFLD. Six-week-old ob/ob mice were orally administered the dairy product kefir (140 mg kg-1 of body weight (BW) per day) for 4 weeks. The data demonstrated that kefir improved fatty liver syndrome on BW, energy expenditure and basal metabolic rate by inhibiting serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) activities (P<0.05) and by decreasing the triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) contents of the liver (P<0.05). Oral kefir administration also significantly reduced the macrovesicular fat quantity in liver tissue. In addition, kefir markedly decreased the expression of the genes sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) (P<0.05) but not the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) or hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1α (CPT1α) in the livers of ob/ob mice.Conclusion:On the basis of these results, we conclude that kefir improves NAFLD on BW, energy expenditure and basal metabolic rate by inhibiting the lipogenesis pathway and that kefir may have the potential for clinical application to the prevention or treatment of NAFLD.

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