Is local anesthesia or oral analgesics necessary after mini-laparoscopic functional surgery in children and young adults? A prospective randomized trial

Yao Chou Tsai, Chia Chang Wu, Stephen Shei Dei Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: This prospective, randomized, single-blind trial was to determine if local anesthesia or oral analgesics reduce postoperative pain after mini-laparoscopic functional surgery. Methods: One hundred fifteen patients who underwent mini-laparoscopic herniorrhaphy or varicocelectomy were assigned randomly to receive wound infiltration with xylocaine, regular oral analgesics, or a placebo after the procedures. Visual analog pain scores owing to carbon-dioxide irritation and trocar wounds were recorded 2 hours, 1 day, and 1 week after surgery. Levels of pain were measured by a visual analog pain scale. Patients age, type of procedure, pressure of gas insufflated, length of procedure, dosage of oral/parenteral analgesics, and trocar-related complications were evaluated. Results: There were no significant differences between groups in the mean pain scores over trocar wounds 2 hours, 1 day, and 1 week after mini-laparoscopic procedures, respectively. There were no significant differences between groups in satisfaction of pain control regimens. Patients who received local anesthesia required fewer on demand meperidine injections than others. Conclusions: Local anesthesia and routine oral analgesic did not significantly reduce postoperative pain after mini-laparoscopic surgeries in children and young adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)344-347
Number of pages4
JournalSurgical Laparoscopy, Endoscopy and Percutaneous Techniques
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Local Anesthesia
Laparoscopy
Analgesics
Young Adult
Surgical Instruments
Pain
Postoperative Pain
Wounds and Injuries
Meperidine
Herniorrhaphy
Pain Measurement
Lidocaine
Carbon Dioxide
Gases
Placebos
Pressure
Injections

Keywords

  • Laparoscopy
  • Local anesthesia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{a727dda696964f7aa4086e3b2d431ef3,
title = "Is local anesthesia or oral analgesics necessary after mini-laparoscopic functional surgery in children and young adults?: A prospective randomized trial",
abstract = "Background: This prospective, randomized, single-blind trial was to determine if local anesthesia or oral analgesics reduce postoperative pain after mini-laparoscopic functional surgery. Methods: One hundred fifteen patients who underwent mini-laparoscopic herniorrhaphy or varicocelectomy were assigned randomly to receive wound infiltration with xylocaine, regular oral analgesics, or a placebo after the procedures. Visual analog pain scores owing to carbon-dioxide irritation and trocar wounds were recorded 2 hours, 1 day, and 1 week after surgery. Levels of pain were measured by a visual analog pain scale. Patients age, type of procedure, pressure of gas insufflated, length of procedure, dosage of oral/parenteral analgesics, and trocar-related complications were evaluated. Results: There were no significant differences between groups in the mean pain scores over trocar wounds 2 hours, 1 day, and 1 week after mini-laparoscopic procedures, respectively. There were no significant differences between groups in satisfaction of pain control regimens. Patients who received local anesthesia required fewer on demand meperidine injections than others. Conclusions: Local anesthesia and routine oral analgesic did not significantly reduce postoperative pain after mini-laparoscopic surgeries in children and young adults.",
keywords = "Laparoscopy, Local anesthesia",
author = "Tsai, {Yao Chou} and Wu, {Chia Chang} and Yang, {Stephen Shei Dei}",
year = "2008",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1097/SLE.0b013e318172ab33",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "344--347",
journal = "Surgical Laparoscopy and Endoscopy",
issn = "1530-4515",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is local anesthesia or oral analgesics necessary after mini-laparoscopic functional surgery in children and young adults?

T2 - A prospective randomized trial

AU - Tsai, Yao Chou

AU - Wu, Chia Chang

AU - Yang, Stephen Shei Dei

PY - 2008/8

Y1 - 2008/8

N2 - Background: This prospective, randomized, single-blind trial was to determine if local anesthesia or oral analgesics reduce postoperative pain after mini-laparoscopic functional surgery. Methods: One hundred fifteen patients who underwent mini-laparoscopic herniorrhaphy or varicocelectomy were assigned randomly to receive wound infiltration with xylocaine, regular oral analgesics, or a placebo after the procedures. Visual analog pain scores owing to carbon-dioxide irritation and trocar wounds were recorded 2 hours, 1 day, and 1 week after surgery. Levels of pain were measured by a visual analog pain scale. Patients age, type of procedure, pressure of gas insufflated, length of procedure, dosage of oral/parenteral analgesics, and trocar-related complications were evaluated. Results: There were no significant differences between groups in the mean pain scores over trocar wounds 2 hours, 1 day, and 1 week after mini-laparoscopic procedures, respectively. There were no significant differences between groups in satisfaction of pain control regimens. Patients who received local anesthesia required fewer on demand meperidine injections than others. Conclusions: Local anesthesia and routine oral analgesic did not significantly reduce postoperative pain after mini-laparoscopic surgeries in children and young adults.

AB - Background: This prospective, randomized, single-blind trial was to determine if local anesthesia or oral analgesics reduce postoperative pain after mini-laparoscopic functional surgery. Methods: One hundred fifteen patients who underwent mini-laparoscopic herniorrhaphy or varicocelectomy were assigned randomly to receive wound infiltration with xylocaine, regular oral analgesics, or a placebo after the procedures. Visual analog pain scores owing to carbon-dioxide irritation and trocar wounds were recorded 2 hours, 1 day, and 1 week after surgery. Levels of pain were measured by a visual analog pain scale. Patients age, type of procedure, pressure of gas insufflated, length of procedure, dosage of oral/parenteral analgesics, and trocar-related complications were evaluated. Results: There were no significant differences between groups in the mean pain scores over trocar wounds 2 hours, 1 day, and 1 week after mini-laparoscopic procedures, respectively. There were no significant differences between groups in satisfaction of pain control regimens. Patients who received local anesthesia required fewer on demand meperidine injections than others. Conclusions: Local anesthesia and routine oral analgesic did not significantly reduce postoperative pain after mini-laparoscopic surgeries in children and young adults.

KW - Laparoscopy

KW - Local anesthesia

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=58149378275&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=58149378275&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/SLE.0b013e318172ab33

DO - 10.1097/SLE.0b013e318172ab33

M3 - Article

C2 - 18716531

AN - SCOPUS:58149378275

VL - 18

SP - 344

EP - 347

JO - Surgical Laparoscopy and Endoscopy

JF - Surgical Laparoscopy and Endoscopy

SN - 1530-4515

IS - 4

ER -