Interaction of dietary carbohydrate, protein and marginal copper on lipid metabolism in rats

S. P. Hu, S. Y. Chen, Ming-Che Hsieh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A study was conducted to explore the effects of the Chinese diet on lipid metabolism. Male weaning Sprague-Dawley rats (N = 40) were fed purified diets for 7 weeks. These diets varied in carbohydrate (rice or corn starch, 62.2%), protein (casein or soybean, 15%) and copper (2.5-8 ppm) in a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial design. Rats receiving marginal levels of copper had significantly lower final body weights and feed efficiencies compared to rats fed adequate levels of copper (p <0.05). The total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels in serum were lower in rats fed rice starch with casein or soy protein diets compared to rats fed corn starch (p <0.05). Serum triglyceride levels were affected by copper levels (p <0.001). High density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C)/TC was higher in rats fed rice starch/soy protein than in rats fed other diets. Groups receiving marginal levels of copper exhibited characteristic signs of copper deficiency: reduced serum copper, hypoceruloplasminemia, and higher relative heart weights (p <0.05). Liver total lipids and cholesterol were influenced by dietary factors; rice starch/soy protein groups had lower values than corn starch/casein groups (p <0.05). Copper adequate groups had lower total liver cholesterol than did the marginal copper groups (p <0.003). In conclusion, the growth and liver cholesterol level of rats were influenced by marginal copper level. Rice starch/soybean diet have protective effects on it.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)249-262
Number of pages14
JournalNutritional Sciences Journal
Volume21
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1996

Fingerprint

Dietary Carbohydrates
dietary carbohydrate
Dietary Proteins
Lipid Metabolism
lipid metabolism
Copper
copper
Starch
rice starch
rats
Diet
proteins
Cholesterol
cholesterol
Soybean Proteins
diet
Caseins
corn starch
soy protein
Sigmodontinae

Keywords

  • casein
  • cholesterol
  • marginal copper
  • rice starch
  • soy protein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Interaction of dietary carbohydrate, protein and marginal copper on lipid metabolism in rats. / Hu, S. P.; Chen, S. Y.; Hsieh, Ming-Che.

In: Nutritional Sciences Journal, Vol. 21, No. 3, 1996, p. 249-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hu, S. P. ; Chen, S. Y. ; Hsieh, Ming-Che. / Interaction of dietary carbohydrate, protein and marginal copper on lipid metabolism in rats. In: Nutritional Sciences Journal. 1996 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 249-262.
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