Intensive Chemotherapy plus Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Support for Distant Metastatic Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

Cheng Hsu Wang, Hong Ming Wang, Jei Shi Chen, Wen Jein Chang, Ging Mi Lai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) has been shown to be highly responsive to chemotherapy. The major limiting toxicity was myelotoxicity. Recently, the role of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in reducing chemotherapy-induced neutropenic sepsis has been well established. In this study, we tested whether recombinant human G-CSF (rhG-CSF) could effectively support the bone marrow function in both previously untreated and pretreated metastatic NPC patients receiving intensive chemotherapy. Twelve patients with distant metastatic disease, 5 newly diagnosed (group A) and 7 pretreated patients (group B), were enrolled to receive BEC (bleomycin, epirubicin and cisplatin), followed by rhG-CSF support (50 μg/m2 s.c. daily for 10 days) every 4 weeks for two cycles. Four patients in group A completed the treatment as scheduled while only 2 patients in group B did. After the first treatment cycle, 6 patients (50%) had grade III-IV myelosuppression. Five of the patients were from group B. The mean values of the white cell count nadir were 2,680 (range 1,200-3,700) in group A and 1,343 (range 400-2,900) in group B (p = 0.0386). Neutropenia-associated fever occurred in 7 patients, 6 of whom had received previous treatment. There were 2 deaths due to toxicity, and both patients had liver metastases within 6 months following radiation. After 24 months of follow-up, only 1 patient is still alive. Our preliminary results suggest that in previously treated metastatic NPC patients, bone marrow suppression is still the major limiting toxic side effect of aggressive chemotherapy, especially for those patients with liver recurrences within 6 months after irradiation and despite rhG-CSF support.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34-37
Number of pages4
JournalOncology
Volume54
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
Drug Therapy
Nasopharyngeal carcinoma
Bone Marrow
Epirubicin
Poisons
Liver
Bleomycin
Neutropenia
Cisplatin
Sepsis
Fever
Therapeutics
Cell Count
Radiation
Neoplasm Metastasis
Recurrence

Keywords

  • Chemotherapy
  • Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor
  • Nasopharyngeal carcinoma, metastatic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Intensive Chemotherapy plus Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Support for Distant Metastatic Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma. / Wang, Cheng Hsu; Wang, Hong Ming; Chen, Jei Shi; Chang, Wen Jein; Lai, Ging Mi.

In: Oncology, Vol. 54, No. SUPPL. 1, 01.1997, p. 34-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Cheng Hsu ; Wang, Hong Ming ; Chen, Jei Shi ; Chang, Wen Jein ; Lai, Ging Mi. / Intensive Chemotherapy plus Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Support for Distant Metastatic Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma. In: Oncology. 1997 ; Vol. 54, No. SUPPL. 1. pp. 34-37.
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