Inhibitory effects of lycopene on the induction of NO, cytokines, and mitogen-activated protein kinase expression by lipopolysaccharide in primary cultured microglia

Kou-Gi Shyu, Wen C. Huang, Po A. Tai, George Hsiao, Duen S. Chou, Lin W. Lee, Jin-Shan Chen, Joen R. Sheu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Microglia are activated in response to brain injury and release neurotoxic factors including nitric oxide (NO) and proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Lycopene, a potent antioxidant, is known to inhibit brain injury. In this study, we found that lycopene (5-20 μM) significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NO release in primary cultured microglia. Lycopene (5-20 μM) also concentration-dependently diminished the LPS-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β in microglia. Further study of the molecular mechanisms revealed that lycopene markedly inhibited extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK1/2) or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation stimulated by LPS in microglia. These results suggest that microglial inactivation by lycopene is at least partially due to activation of ERK1/2 phosphorylation Therefore, inhibition of NO and proinflammatory cytokine production in activated microglia by lycopene may represent a powerful and potential therapeutic strategy for various neurodegenerative diseases including ischemia-reperfusion cerebral infarction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)579-586
Number of pages8
JournalPharmaceutical Biology
Volume46
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2008

Fingerprint

neuroglia
Microglia
lycopene
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
mitogen-activated protein kinase
lipopolysaccharides
nitric oxide
Lipopolysaccharides
Nitric Oxide
cytokines
Cytokines
Phosphorylation
tumor necrosis factors
interleukin-1
Interleukin-1
Brain Injuries
Brain
phosphorylation
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 9
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha

Keywords

  • Cytokines
  • ERKs
  • Lipopolysaccharide
  • Lycopene
  • Microglia
  • NO

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science
  • Medical Laboratory Technology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Inhibitory effects of lycopene on the induction of NO, cytokines, and mitogen-activated protein kinase expression by lipopolysaccharide in primary cultured microglia. / Shyu, Kou-Gi; Huang, Wen C.; Tai, Po A.; Hsiao, George; Chou, Duen S.; Lee, Lin W.; Chen, Jin-Shan; Sheu, Joen R.

In: Pharmaceutical Biology, Vol. 46, No. 9, 09.2008, p. 579-586.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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