Influence of antipsychotic agents on heart rate variability in male WKY rats

Implications for cardiovascular safety

Ying Chieh Wang, Chun Yu Chen, Terry B J Kuo, Ching Jung Lai, Cheryl C H Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Sudden cardiac death is higher among schizophrenic patients and is associated with parasympathetic hypoactivity. Antipsychotic agents are highly suspected to be a precipitating factor. Thus, we aimed to test if the antipsychotics haloperidol, risperidone and clozapine affect cardiac autonomic function, excluding the confounding effect of altered sleep structure by the drugs. Methods: In this study, haloperidol, risperidone and clozapine were given separately by intraperitoneal injection to male Wistar-Kyoto rats for 5 days. Electroencephalogram (EEG), electromyogram (EMG) and electrocardiographic signals were recorded at baseline and 5 days after drug treatments. Sleep scoring was based on EEG and EMG signals. Cardiac autonomic function was assessed using heart rate variability analysis. Results: Clozapine increased heart rate and suppressed cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic activity. Cardiac acceleration was more severe during sleep. Haloperidol tended to decrease heart rate while risperidone mildly increased heart rate; however, their effects were less obvious than those of clozapine. There was a significant drug-by-stage interaction on several heart rate variability measures. Conclusion: Taking this evidence as a whole, we conclude that haloperidol has a better level of cardiovascular safety than either risperidone or clozapine. Application of this approach to other psychotropic agents in the future will be a useful and helpful way to evaluate the cardiovascular safety of the various psychotropic medications that are in clinical use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)216-226
Number of pages11
JournalNeuropsychobiology
Volume65
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Inbred WKY Rats
Clozapine
Risperidone
Antipsychotic Agents
Haloperidol
Heart Rate
Safety
Sleep
Electromyography
Electroencephalography
Precipitating Factors
Sudden Cardiac Death
Intraperitoneal Injections
Drug Interactions
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Antipsychotics
  • Autonomic activity
  • Cardiovascular safety
  • Heart rate variability
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Influence of antipsychotic agents on heart rate variability in male WKY rats : Implications for cardiovascular safety. / Wang, Ying Chieh; Chen, Chun Yu; Kuo, Terry B J; Lai, Ching Jung; Yang, Cheryl C H.

In: Neuropsychobiology, Vol. 65, No. 4, 06.2012, p. 216-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Ying Chieh ; Chen, Chun Yu ; Kuo, Terry B J ; Lai, Ching Jung ; Yang, Cheryl C H. / Influence of antipsychotic agents on heart rate variability in male WKY rats : Implications for cardiovascular safety. In: Neuropsychobiology. 2012 ; Vol. 65, No. 4. pp. 216-226.
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