Individual-, household- and neighbourhood-level characteristics associated with life satisfaction: A multilevel analysis of a population-based sample from Hong Kong

Chia Yueh Hsu, Shu Sen Chang, Paul Yip

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the relationships between individuals’ life satisfaction and individual-, household- and neighbourhood-level characteristics and evidence for cross-level interactions. We used data on individuals’ life satisfaction and a range of individual- and household-level characteristics from the Hong Kong Panel Study of Social Dynamics (2011) with linkage to neighbourhood-level aggregated data extracted from the 2011 census. The neighbourhood-level variables included the poverty rate and four factors derived from factor analysis based on 21 variables. Multilevel models were used to allow for the hierarchical nature of the data. Most of the variance in life satisfaction could be explained by individual- and household-level characteristics. Neighbourhood-level characteristics accounted for a small proportion (around 5% or less) of the variance. Most of the individual- and household-level characteristics studied were associated with life satisfaction. Life satisfaction was negatively associated with local poverty rate and three neighbourhood factors (deprivation, social fragmentation and ageing). There was evidence of cross-level interactions. For example, the level of life satisfaction decreased with an increasing neighbourhood poverty rate among individuals who did not receive Comprehensive Social Security Assistance (CSSA), but CSSA recipients had a higher level of life satisfaction in areas with higher poverty rates. The negative effect of neighbourhood poverty on life satisfaction was more marked in individuals who rented or owned their homes than in those who lived in public housing. Our results have implications for urban policies that may improve life satisfaction such as financial and housing support for high risk individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3700-3717
Number of pages18
JournalUrban Studies
Volume54
Issue number16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

satisfaction with life
multi-level analysis
Hong Kong
poverty
social security
assistance
social deprivation
analysis
life satisfaction
household
urban policy
public housing
interaction
factor analysis
fragmentation
evidence
census
recipient
housing
rate

Keywords

  • census
  • Hong Kong
  • life satisfaction
  • multilevel
  • wellbeing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Individual-, household- and neighbourhood-level characteristics associated with life satisfaction : A multilevel analysis of a population-based sample from Hong Kong. / Hsu, Chia Yueh; Chang, Shu Sen; Yip, Paul.

In: Urban Studies, Vol. 54, No. 16, 01.12.2017, p. 3700-3717.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{86520ef8b2d840d4b7963682cb31c955,
title = "Individual-, household- and neighbourhood-level characteristics associated with life satisfaction: A multilevel analysis of a population-based sample from Hong Kong",
abstract = "We examined the relationships between individuals’ life satisfaction and individual-, household- and neighbourhood-level characteristics and evidence for cross-level interactions. We used data on individuals’ life satisfaction and a range of individual- and household-level characteristics from the Hong Kong Panel Study of Social Dynamics (2011) with linkage to neighbourhood-level aggregated data extracted from the 2011 census. The neighbourhood-level variables included the poverty rate and four factors derived from factor analysis based on 21 variables. Multilevel models were used to allow for the hierarchical nature of the data. Most of the variance in life satisfaction could be explained by individual- and household-level characteristics. Neighbourhood-level characteristics accounted for a small proportion (around 5{\%} or less) of the variance. Most of the individual- and household-level characteristics studied were associated with life satisfaction. Life satisfaction was negatively associated with local poverty rate and three neighbourhood factors (deprivation, social fragmentation and ageing). There was evidence of cross-level interactions. For example, the level of life satisfaction decreased with an increasing neighbourhood poverty rate among individuals who did not receive Comprehensive Social Security Assistance (CSSA), but CSSA recipients had a higher level of life satisfaction in areas with higher poverty rates. The negative effect of neighbourhood poverty on life satisfaction was more marked in individuals who rented or owned their homes than in those who lived in public housing. Our results have implications for urban policies that may improve life satisfaction such as financial and housing support for high risk individuals.",
keywords = "census, Hong Kong, life satisfaction, multilevel, wellbeing",
author = "Hsu, {Chia Yueh} and Chang, {Shu Sen} and Paul Yip",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0042098016677208",
language = "English",
volume = "54",
pages = "3700--3717",
journal = "Urban Studies",
issn = "0042-0980",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "16",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Individual-, household- and neighbourhood-level characteristics associated with life satisfaction

T2 - A multilevel analysis of a population-based sample from Hong Kong

AU - Hsu, Chia Yueh

AU - Chang, Shu Sen

AU - Yip, Paul

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - We examined the relationships between individuals’ life satisfaction and individual-, household- and neighbourhood-level characteristics and evidence for cross-level interactions. We used data on individuals’ life satisfaction and a range of individual- and household-level characteristics from the Hong Kong Panel Study of Social Dynamics (2011) with linkage to neighbourhood-level aggregated data extracted from the 2011 census. The neighbourhood-level variables included the poverty rate and four factors derived from factor analysis based on 21 variables. Multilevel models were used to allow for the hierarchical nature of the data. Most of the variance in life satisfaction could be explained by individual- and household-level characteristics. Neighbourhood-level characteristics accounted for a small proportion (around 5% or less) of the variance. Most of the individual- and household-level characteristics studied were associated with life satisfaction. Life satisfaction was negatively associated with local poverty rate and three neighbourhood factors (deprivation, social fragmentation and ageing). There was evidence of cross-level interactions. For example, the level of life satisfaction decreased with an increasing neighbourhood poverty rate among individuals who did not receive Comprehensive Social Security Assistance (CSSA), but CSSA recipients had a higher level of life satisfaction in areas with higher poverty rates. The negative effect of neighbourhood poverty on life satisfaction was more marked in individuals who rented or owned their homes than in those who lived in public housing. Our results have implications for urban policies that may improve life satisfaction such as financial and housing support for high risk individuals.

AB - We examined the relationships between individuals’ life satisfaction and individual-, household- and neighbourhood-level characteristics and evidence for cross-level interactions. We used data on individuals’ life satisfaction and a range of individual- and household-level characteristics from the Hong Kong Panel Study of Social Dynamics (2011) with linkage to neighbourhood-level aggregated data extracted from the 2011 census. The neighbourhood-level variables included the poverty rate and four factors derived from factor analysis based on 21 variables. Multilevel models were used to allow for the hierarchical nature of the data. Most of the variance in life satisfaction could be explained by individual- and household-level characteristics. Neighbourhood-level characteristics accounted for a small proportion (around 5% or less) of the variance. Most of the individual- and household-level characteristics studied were associated with life satisfaction. Life satisfaction was negatively associated with local poverty rate and three neighbourhood factors (deprivation, social fragmentation and ageing). There was evidence of cross-level interactions. For example, the level of life satisfaction decreased with an increasing neighbourhood poverty rate among individuals who did not receive Comprehensive Social Security Assistance (CSSA), but CSSA recipients had a higher level of life satisfaction in areas with higher poverty rates. The negative effect of neighbourhood poverty on life satisfaction was more marked in individuals who rented or owned their homes than in those who lived in public housing. Our results have implications for urban policies that may improve life satisfaction such as financial and housing support for high risk individuals.

KW - census

KW - Hong Kong

KW - life satisfaction

KW - multilevel

KW - wellbeing

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85034446279&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85034446279&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0042098016677208

DO - 10.1177/0042098016677208

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85034446279

VL - 54

SP - 3700

EP - 3717

JO - Urban Studies

JF - Urban Studies

SN - 0042-0980

IS - 16

ER -