12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background There is compelling evidence that children of mothers with postnatal depression (PD) experience poor developmental outcomes. However, no studies have specifically ascertained the risk of mortality for offspring during preschool years, the most catastrophic outcome in the vulnerable period. This nationwide population-based study aimed to investigate whether maternal depression in the first year after giving birth was associated with increased mortality risk among their preschool children aged up to 5 years. Method Three nationwide population-based datasets [the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD), birth certificate registry and death certificate registry] were linked in this study. A total of 10 236 offspring of mothers with PD were recruited, together with a comparison cohort of 81 888 births matched with the affected women in terms of maternal age and year of delivery. Each child was traced for 5 years from delivery between 2001 and 2003 until the end of 2008 to determine mortality during preschool years. Results During preschool years, 98 (0.96%) deaths were identified among the offspring of mothers with PD and 470 (0.57%) children in the comparison cohort died. For children up to 5 years old, exposure to maternal PD was independently associated with a 1.47-fold [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.87] increased mortality risk, after adjusting for family income, urbanization level and the characteristics of mother, father and infant. The risk of death by unnatural causes was even higher (about 2.23 times the risk, 95% CI 1.34-3.70) among exposed offspring. Conclusions PD places preschool children at significantly increased risk of mortality, especially from unnatural causes of death.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2287-2296
Number of pages10
JournalPsychological Medicine
Volume41
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2011

Fingerprint

Postpartum Depression
Taiwan
Mothers
Mortality
Population
Preschool Children
Registries
Cause of Death
Parturition
Confidence Intervals
Birth Certificates
Maternal Exposure
Urbanization
Death Certificates
Maternal Age
National Health Programs
Fathers
Databases
Depression
Research

Keywords

  • Mortality risk
  • offspring
  • postnatal depression
  • unnatural causes of death

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

@article{e8b23b12ea57487bb80428fc05b121aa,
title = "Increased mortality risk among offspring of mothers with postnatal depression: A nationwide population-based study in Taiwan",
abstract = "Background There is compelling evidence that children of mothers with postnatal depression (PD) experience poor developmental outcomes. However, no studies have specifically ascertained the risk of mortality for offspring during preschool years, the most catastrophic outcome in the vulnerable period. This nationwide population-based study aimed to investigate whether maternal depression in the first year after giving birth was associated with increased mortality risk among their preschool children aged up to 5 years. Method Three nationwide population-based datasets [the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD), birth certificate registry and death certificate registry] were linked in this study. A total of 10 236 offspring of mothers with PD were recruited, together with a comparison cohort of 81 888 births matched with the affected women in terms of maternal age and year of delivery. Each child was traced for 5 years from delivery between 2001 and 2003 until the end of 2008 to determine mortality during preschool years. Results During preschool years, 98 (0.96{\%}) deaths were identified among the offspring of mothers with PD and 470 (0.57{\%}) children in the comparison cohort died. For children up to 5 years old, exposure to maternal PD was independently associated with a 1.47-fold [95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.87] increased mortality risk, after adjusting for family income, urbanization level and the characteristics of mother, father and infant. The risk of death by unnatural causes was even higher (about 2.23 times the risk, 95{\%} CI 1.34-3.70) among exposed offspring. Conclusions PD places preschool children at significantly increased risk of mortality, especially from unnatural causes of death.",
keywords = "Mortality risk, offspring, postnatal depression, unnatural causes of death",
author = "Chen, {Y. H.} and Tsai, {S. Y.} and Lin, {H. C.}",
year = "2011",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1017/S0033291711000584",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
pages = "2287--2296",
journal = "Psychological Medicine",
issn = "0033-2917",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Increased mortality risk among offspring of mothers with postnatal depression

T2 - A nationwide population-based study in Taiwan

AU - Chen, Y. H.

AU - Tsai, S. Y.

AU - Lin, H. C.

PY - 2011/11

Y1 - 2011/11

N2 - Background There is compelling evidence that children of mothers with postnatal depression (PD) experience poor developmental outcomes. However, no studies have specifically ascertained the risk of mortality for offspring during preschool years, the most catastrophic outcome in the vulnerable period. This nationwide population-based study aimed to investigate whether maternal depression in the first year after giving birth was associated with increased mortality risk among their preschool children aged up to 5 years. Method Three nationwide population-based datasets [the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD), birth certificate registry and death certificate registry] were linked in this study. A total of 10 236 offspring of mothers with PD were recruited, together with a comparison cohort of 81 888 births matched with the affected women in terms of maternal age and year of delivery. Each child was traced for 5 years from delivery between 2001 and 2003 until the end of 2008 to determine mortality during preschool years. Results During preschool years, 98 (0.96%) deaths were identified among the offspring of mothers with PD and 470 (0.57%) children in the comparison cohort died. For children up to 5 years old, exposure to maternal PD was independently associated with a 1.47-fold [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.87] increased mortality risk, after adjusting for family income, urbanization level and the characteristics of mother, father and infant. The risk of death by unnatural causes was even higher (about 2.23 times the risk, 95% CI 1.34-3.70) among exposed offspring. Conclusions PD places preschool children at significantly increased risk of mortality, especially from unnatural causes of death.

AB - Background There is compelling evidence that children of mothers with postnatal depression (PD) experience poor developmental outcomes. However, no studies have specifically ascertained the risk of mortality for offspring during preschool years, the most catastrophic outcome in the vulnerable period. This nationwide population-based study aimed to investigate whether maternal depression in the first year after giving birth was associated with increased mortality risk among their preschool children aged up to 5 years. Method Three nationwide population-based datasets [the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD), birth certificate registry and death certificate registry] were linked in this study. A total of 10 236 offspring of mothers with PD were recruited, together with a comparison cohort of 81 888 births matched with the affected women in terms of maternal age and year of delivery. Each child was traced for 5 years from delivery between 2001 and 2003 until the end of 2008 to determine mortality during preschool years. Results During preschool years, 98 (0.96%) deaths were identified among the offspring of mothers with PD and 470 (0.57%) children in the comparison cohort died. For children up to 5 years old, exposure to maternal PD was independently associated with a 1.47-fold [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.87] increased mortality risk, after adjusting for family income, urbanization level and the characteristics of mother, father and infant. The risk of death by unnatural causes was even higher (about 2.23 times the risk, 95% CI 1.34-3.70) among exposed offspring. Conclusions PD places preschool children at significantly increased risk of mortality, especially from unnatural causes of death.

KW - Mortality risk

KW - offspring

KW - postnatal depression

KW - unnatural causes of death

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80054895692&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80054895692&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S0033291711000584

DO - 10.1017/S0033291711000584

M3 - Article

C2 - 21524332

AN - SCOPUS:80054895692

VL - 41

SP - 2287

EP - 2296

JO - Psychological Medicine

JF - Psychological Medicine

SN - 0033-2917

IS - 11

ER -