Abstract

Background & aims The relationship between stroke and diabetes is not completely understood. This study evaluated diabetes risk and post-diabetes adverse events in patients with stroke. Methods We identified 10,255 adults, newly diagnosed with stroke from 2000 to 2005, using the Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort of 41,020 adults without stroke was randomly selected from the same dataset, frequency matched by age and sex. Diabetes events from 2000 to 2013 were ascertained from medical claims. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were calculated for diabetes associated with stroke. A nested cohort study of 33,437 patients with inpatient care for diabetes between 2008 and 2013 was conducted to calculate the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for adverse events after diabetes, in patients with and without stroke. Results During 489,561 person-years of follow-up, there were 10,742 newly diagnosed diabetes cases. The incidence of diabetes for people with and without stroke was 43.9 and 17.8 per 1000 person-years, respectively (p < 0.0001). Compared to that for people without stroke, the adjusted HR for diabetes was 2.69 (95% CI 2.56–2.82) for stroke patients. The ORs of post-diabetes pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and mortality associated with stroke were 1.35 (95% CI 1.17–1.55), 1.52 (95% CI 1.36–1.70), and 1.71 (95% CI 1.27–2.29), respectively. Conclusions We provide evidence that the consequences of stroke are not limited to the neurological defect, but evoke diabetes and a plethora of associated medical, psychological and social impacts the physician must be strongly aware of if evaluating and treating stroke patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-92
Number of pages6
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume265
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2017

Fingerprint

Interpersonal Relations
Stroke
Odds Ratio
National Health Programs
Social Change
Taiwan
Urinary Tract Infections
Inpatients
Pneumonia
Cohort Studies
Databases
Psychology
Physicians

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Outcome
  • Risk
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{0e640a5f386043e6a23773ae5596ddf8,
title = "Increased diabetes risk and interaction with social and medical events in patients upon stroke: Two nationwide studies",
abstract = "Background & aims The relationship between stroke and diabetes is not completely understood. This study evaluated diabetes risk and post-diabetes adverse events in patients with stroke. Methods We identified 10,255 adults, newly diagnosed with stroke from 2000 to 2005, using the Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort of 41,020 adults without stroke was randomly selected from the same dataset, frequency matched by age and sex. Diabetes events from 2000 to 2013 were ascertained from medical claims. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95{\%} CIs were calculated for diabetes associated with stroke. A nested cohort study of 33,437 patients with inpatient care for diabetes between 2008 and 2013 was conducted to calculate the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95{\%} CIs for adverse events after diabetes, in patients with and without stroke. Results During 489,561 person-years of follow-up, there were 10,742 newly diagnosed diabetes cases. The incidence of diabetes for people with and without stroke was 43.9 and 17.8 per 1000 person-years, respectively (p < 0.0001). Compared to that for people without stroke, the adjusted HR for diabetes was 2.69 (95{\%} CI 2.56–2.82) for stroke patients. The ORs of post-diabetes pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and mortality associated with stroke were 1.35 (95{\%} CI 1.17–1.55), 1.52 (95{\%} CI 1.36–1.70), and 1.71 (95{\%} CI 1.27–2.29), respectively. Conclusions We provide evidence that the consequences of stroke are not limited to the neurological defect, but evoke diabetes and a plethora of associated medical, psychological and social impacts the physician must be strongly aware of if evaluating and treating stroke patients.",
keywords = "Diabetes, Outcome, Risk, Stroke",
author = "Chu, {Lu Min} and Liu, {Chih Chung} and Yeh, {Chun Chieh} and Chang, {Yi Cheng} and Hu, {Chaur Jong} and Shih, {Chun Chuan} and Cherng, {Yih Giun} and Chen, {Ta Liang} and Liao, {Chien Chang}",
year = "2017",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2017.08.017",
language = "English",
volume = "265",
pages = "87--92",
journal = "Atherosclerosis",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Increased diabetes risk and interaction with social and medical events in patients upon stroke

T2 - Two nationwide studies

AU - Chu, Lu Min

AU - Liu, Chih Chung

AU - Yeh, Chun Chieh

AU - Chang, Yi Cheng

AU - Hu, Chaur Jong

AU - Shih, Chun Chuan

AU - Cherng, Yih Giun

AU - Chen, Ta Liang

AU - Liao, Chien Chang

PY - 2017/10/1

Y1 - 2017/10/1

N2 - Background & aims The relationship between stroke and diabetes is not completely understood. This study evaluated diabetes risk and post-diabetes adverse events in patients with stroke. Methods We identified 10,255 adults, newly diagnosed with stroke from 2000 to 2005, using the Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort of 41,020 adults without stroke was randomly selected from the same dataset, frequency matched by age and sex. Diabetes events from 2000 to 2013 were ascertained from medical claims. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were calculated for diabetes associated with stroke. A nested cohort study of 33,437 patients with inpatient care for diabetes between 2008 and 2013 was conducted to calculate the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for adverse events after diabetes, in patients with and without stroke. Results During 489,561 person-years of follow-up, there were 10,742 newly diagnosed diabetes cases. The incidence of diabetes for people with and without stroke was 43.9 and 17.8 per 1000 person-years, respectively (p < 0.0001). Compared to that for people without stroke, the adjusted HR for diabetes was 2.69 (95% CI 2.56–2.82) for stroke patients. The ORs of post-diabetes pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and mortality associated with stroke were 1.35 (95% CI 1.17–1.55), 1.52 (95% CI 1.36–1.70), and 1.71 (95% CI 1.27–2.29), respectively. Conclusions We provide evidence that the consequences of stroke are not limited to the neurological defect, but evoke diabetes and a plethora of associated medical, psychological and social impacts the physician must be strongly aware of if evaluating and treating stroke patients.

AB - Background & aims The relationship between stroke and diabetes is not completely understood. This study evaluated diabetes risk and post-diabetes adverse events in patients with stroke. Methods We identified 10,255 adults, newly diagnosed with stroke from 2000 to 2005, using the Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort of 41,020 adults without stroke was randomly selected from the same dataset, frequency matched by age and sex. Diabetes events from 2000 to 2013 were ascertained from medical claims. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were calculated for diabetes associated with stroke. A nested cohort study of 33,437 patients with inpatient care for diabetes between 2008 and 2013 was conducted to calculate the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for adverse events after diabetes, in patients with and without stroke. Results During 489,561 person-years of follow-up, there were 10,742 newly diagnosed diabetes cases. The incidence of diabetes for people with and without stroke was 43.9 and 17.8 per 1000 person-years, respectively (p < 0.0001). Compared to that for people without stroke, the adjusted HR for diabetes was 2.69 (95% CI 2.56–2.82) for stroke patients. The ORs of post-diabetes pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and mortality associated with stroke were 1.35 (95% CI 1.17–1.55), 1.52 (95% CI 1.36–1.70), and 1.71 (95% CI 1.27–2.29), respectively. Conclusions We provide evidence that the consequences of stroke are not limited to the neurological defect, but evoke diabetes and a plethora of associated medical, psychological and social impacts the physician must be strongly aware of if evaluating and treating stroke patients.

KW - Diabetes

KW - Outcome

KW - Risk

KW - Stroke

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