Abstract

Objective To assess the efficacy and benefits of pelvic rehabilitation programs in terms of functional outcomes and quality of life for patients with fecal incontinence and defecation disorders after rectal cancer surgery. Design Prospective, observational study. Setting University hospital physiotherapy clinics. Participants Patients (N=32) who experienced fecal incontinence after sphincter-saving surgery with the intersphincteric resection (ISR) technique and could follow and cooperate with the treatment schedule were included in the present study. Interventions Pelvic rehabilitation programs included electrical stimulation (ES) and biofeedback (BF). Main Outcome Measures Functional results, Wexner score, and anorectal manometry were used to assess the clinical outcomes of rehabilitation treatment. Results Maximum squeeze pressure improved after rehabilitation training (P=.014). There were no statistical differences in resting pressure, resting muscle electromyography, and maximum squeeze electromyography (P=.061, P=.76, and P=.99, respectively). The mean stool frequency was 18.8 per 24 hours before the pelvic intervention program and 7.8 per 24 hours after ES and BF training (P<.001). Of the 32 patients, 27 required antidiarrheal medications before treatment, and after completion of the training, only 9 patients still needed antidiarrheal medications (P<.001). Significant improvements were observed in the Wexner score (17.74 vs 12.93; P<.001). Conclusions Our data show that ES and BF are effective in the treatment of fecal incontinence, leading to improvement of quality of life for patients with low rectal cancer after ISR. © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1442-1447
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume96
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Fecal Incontinence
Rectal Neoplasms
Electric Stimulation
Quality of Life
Rehabilitation
Antidiarrheals
Electromyography
Pressure
Defecation
Manometry
Observational Studies
Appointments and Schedules
Therapeutics
Medicine
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Muscles

Cite this

@article{3b9dad8e37584b60a1b89d25c81e3dcd,
title = "Improvement of Fecal Incontinence and Quality of Life by Electrical Stimulation and Biofeedback for Patients with Low Rectal Cancer after Intersphincteric Resection",
abstract = "Objective To assess the efficacy and benefits of pelvic rehabilitation programs in terms of functional outcomes and quality of life for patients with fecal incontinence and defecation disorders after rectal cancer surgery. Design Prospective, observational study. Setting University hospital physiotherapy clinics. Participants Patients (N=32) who experienced fecal incontinence after sphincter-saving surgery with the intersphincteric resection (ISR) technique and could follow and cooperate with the treatment schedule were included in the present study. Interventions Pelvic rehabilitation programs included electrical stimulation (ES) and biofeedback (BF). Main Outcome Measures Functional results, Wexner score, and anorectal manometry were used to assess the clinical outcomes of rehabilitation treatment. Results Maximum squeeze pressure improved after rehabilitation training (P=.014). There were no statistical differences in resting pressure, resting muscle electromyography, and maximum squeeze electromyography (P=.061, P=.76, and P=.99, respectively). The mean stool frequency was 18.8 per 24 hours before the pelvic intervention program and 7.8 per 24 hours after ES and BF training (P<.001). Of the 32 patients, 27 required antidiarrheal medications before treatment, and after completion of the training, only 9 patients still needed antidiarrheal medications (P<.001). Significant improvements were observed in the Wexner score (17.74 vs 12.93; P<.001). Conclusions Our data show that ES and BF are effective in the treatment of fecal incontinence, leading to improvement of quality of life for patients with low rectal cancer after ISR. {\circledC} 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine.",
author = "Li-Jen Kuo and Lin, {Yu Ching} and Chien-Hung Lai and Yen-Kuang Lin and Huang, {Yu Shih} and Hu, {Chia Chen} and Shih-Ching Chen",
note = "Export Date: 1 February 2016",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1016/j.apmr.2015.03.013",
language = "English",
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pages = "1442--1447",
journal = "Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation",
issn = "0003-9993",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Improvement of Fecal Incontinence and Quality of Life by Electrical Stimulation and Biofeedback for Patients with Low Rectal Cancer after Intersphincteric Resection

AU - Kuo, Li-Jen

AU - Lin, Yu Ching

AU - Lai, Chien-Hung

AU - Lin, Yen-Kuang

AU - Huang, Yu Shih

AU - Hu, Chia Chen

AU - Chen, Shih-Ching

N1 - Export Date: 1 February 2016

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Objective To assess the efficacy and benefits of pelvic rehabilitation programs in terms of functional outcomes and quality of life for patients with fecal incontinence and defecation disorders after rectal cancer surgery. Design Prospective, observational study. Setting University hospital physiotherapy clinics. Participants Patients (N=32) who experienced fecal incontinence after sphincter-saving surgery with the intersphincteric resection (ISR) technique and could follow and cooperate with the treatment schedule were included in the present study. Interventions Pelvic rehabilitation programs included electrical stimulation (ES) and biofeedback (BF). Main Outcome Measures Functional results, Wexner score, and anorectal manometry were used to assess the clinical outcomes of rehabilitation treatment. Results Maximum squeeze pressure improved after rehabilitation training (P=.014). There were no statistical differences in resting pressure, resting muscle electromyography, and maximum squeeze electromyography (P=.061, P=.76, and P=.99, respectively). The mean stool frequency was 18.8 per 24 hours before the pelvic intervention program and 7.8 per 24 hours after ES and BF training (P<.001). Of the 32 patients, 27 required antidiarrheal medications before treatment, and after completion of the training, only 9 patients still needed antidiarrheal medications (P<.001). Significant improvements were observed in the Wexner score (17.74 vs 12.93; P<.001). Conclusions Our data show that ES and BF are effective in the treatment of fecal incontinence, leading to improvement of quality of life for patients with low rectal cancer after ISR. © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine.

AB - Objective To assess the efficacy and benefits of pelvic rehabilitation programs in terms of functional outcomes and quality of life for patients with fecal incontinence and defecation disorders after rectal cancer surgery. Design Prospective, observational study. Setting University hospital physiotherapy clinics. Participants Patients (N=32) who experienced fecal incontinence after sphincter-saving surgery with the intersphincteric resection (ISR) technique and could follow and cooperate with the treatment schedule were included in the present study. Interventions Pelvic rehabilitation programs included electrical stimulation (ES) and biofeedback (BF). Main Outcome Measures Functional results, Wexner score, and anorectal manometry were used to assess the clinical outcomes of rehabilitation treatment. Results Maximum squeeze pressure improved after rehabilitation training (P=.014). There were no statistical differences in resting pressure, resting muscle electromyography, and maximum squeeze electromyography (P=.061, P=.76, and P=.99, respectively). The mean stool frequency was 18.8 per 24 hours before the pelvic intervention program and 7.8 per 24 hours after ES and BF training (P<.001). Of the 32 patients, 27 required antidiarrheal medications before treatment, and after completion of the training, only 9 patients still needed antidiarrheal medications (P<.001). Significant improvements were observed in the Wexner score (17.74 vs 12.93; P<.001). Conclusions Our data show that ES and BF are effective in the treatment of fecal incontinence, leading to improvement of quality of life for patients with low rectal cancer after ISR. © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine.

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DO - 10.1016/j.apmr.2015.03.013

M3 - Article

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JF - Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

SN - 0003-9993

IS - 8

ER -