Abstract

Background A solvent/detergent (S/D) treatment in a medical device has been developed for pathogen reduction of plasma for transfusion. Impact of S/D on bacterial growth and on the capacity of complement to kill bacteria has been investigated in this study. Study design and methods A pool of apheresis plasma from four donors was spiked with eight transfusion-relevant bacteria. Plasma was treated with 1% tri(n-butyl) phosphate and 1% Triton X-45 at 31°C for 90min and then extracted by oil at 31°C for 70min. Decomplemented plasma and Phosphate Buffer Saline were used as controls. Bacterial count was determined in samples taken immediately after spiking, or after S/D and oil treatment. Similar experiments were conducted using three individual recovered plasma donations. Bacteria growth inhibition tests were performed using discs soaked with plasma samples whether containing the S/D agents or not. Results The mean reduction factors of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae due to complement during S/D treatment were >8·75, 4·71, and 4·18 log in pooled plasma and >7·42, 2·24 and >6·08 log in individual plasmas, respectively. Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis were inactivated by S/D (>7·04 and 1·60 log in pooled, and >6·06 and 2·39 in individual plasmas, respectively). Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterobacter cloacae did not multiply during S/D treatment of plasma. Growth inhibition tests revealed an inhibition of three Gram-negative bacteria by complement and all Gram-positive by S/D. Conclusion The S/D treatment of plasma does not alter the bactericidal activity of complement, and inactivates some Gram-positive bacteria.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)277-284
Number of pages8
JournalVox Sanguinis
Volume102
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2012

Fingerprint

Detergents
Bacteria
Therapeutics
Oils
Growth
Enterobacter cloacae
Blood Component Removal
Bacillus cereus
Staphylococcus epidermidis
Bacterial Load
Octoxynol
Klebsiella pneumoniae
Gram-Positive Bacteria
Bacillus subtilis
Gram-Negative Bacteria
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Staphylococcus aureus
Buffers
Phosphates
Escherichia coli

Keywords

  • Blood establishments
  • Filtration
  • Plasma
  • Solvent-detergent
  • Viral inactivation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Impact of solvent/detergent treatment of plasma on transfusion-relevant bacteria. / Chou, M. L.; Wu, Y. W.; Su, C. Y.; Lee, L. W.; Burnouf, T.

In: Vox Sanguinis, Vol. 102, No. 4, 05.2012, p. 277-284.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chou, M. L. ; Wu, Y. W. ; Su, C. Y. ; Lee, L. W. ; Burnouf, T. / Impact of solvent/detergent treatment of plasma on transfusion-relevant bacteria. In: Vox Sanguinis. 2012 ; Vol. 102, No. 4. pp. 277-284.
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abstract = "Background A solvent/detergent (S/D) treatment in a medical device has been developed for pathogen reduction of plasma for transfusion. Impact of S/D on bacterial growth and on the capacity of complement to kill bacteria has been investigated in this study. Study design and methods A pool of apheresis plasma from four donors was spiked with eight transfusion-relevant bacteria. Plasma was treated with 1{\%} tri(n-butyl) phosphate and 1{\%} Triton X-45 at 31°C for 90min and then extracted by oil at 31°C for 70min. Decomplemented plasma and Phosphate Buffer Saline were used as controls. Bacterial count was determined in samples taken immediately after spiking, or after S/D and oil treatment. Similar experiments were conducted using three individual recovered plasma donations. Bacteria growth inhibition tests were performed using discs soaked with plasma samples whether containing the S/D agents or not. Results The mean reduction factors of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae due to complement during S/D treatment were >8·75, 4·71, and 4·18 log in pooled plasma and >7·42, 2·24 and >6·08 log in individual plasmas, respectively. Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis were inactivated by S/D (>7·04 and 1·60 log in pooled, and >6·06 and 2·39 in individual plasmas, respectively). Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterobacter cloacae did not multiply during S/D treatment of plasma. Growth inhibition tests revealed an inhibition of three Gram-negative bacteria by complement and all Gram-positive by S/D. Conclusion The S/D treatment of plasma does not alter the bactericidal activity of complement, and inactivates some Gram-positive bacteria.",
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AU - Chou, M. L.

AU - Wu, Y. W.

AU - Su, C. Y.

AU - Lee, L. W.

AU - Burnouf, T.

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N2 - Background A solvent/detergent (S/D) treatment in a medical device has been developed for pathogen reduction of plasma for transfusion. Impact of S/D on bacterial growth and on the capacity of complement to kill bacteria has been investigated in this study. Study design and methods A pool of apheresis plasma from four donors was spiked with eight transfusion-relevant bacteria. Plasma was treated with 1% tri(n-butyl) phosphate and 1% Triton X-45 at 31°C for 90min and then extracted by oil at 31°C for 70min. Decomplemented plasma and Phosphate Buffer Saline were used as controls. Bacterial count was determined in samples taken immediately after spiking, or after S/D and oil treatment. Similar experiments were conducted using three individual recovered plasma donations. Bacteria growth inhibition tests were performed using discs soaked with plasma samples whether containing the S/D agents or not. Results The mean reduction factors of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae due to complement during S/D treatment were >8·75, 4·71, and 4·18 log in pooled plasma and >7·42, 2·24 and >6·08 log in individual plasmas, respectively. Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis were inactivated by S/D (>7·04 and 1·60 log in pooled, and >6·06 and 2·39 in individual plasmas, respectively). Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterobacter cloacae did not multiply during S/D treatment of plasma. Growth inhibition tests revealed an inhibition of three Gram-negative bacteria by complement and all Gram-positive by S/D. Conclusion The S/D treatment of plasma does not alter the bactericidal activity of complement, and inactivates some Gram-positive bacteria.

AB - Background A solvent/detergent (S/D) treatment in a medical device has been developed for pathogen reduction of plasma for transfusion. Impact of S/D on bacterial growth and on the capacity of complement to kill bacteria has been investigated in this study. Study design and methods A pool of apheresis plasma from four donors was spiked with eight transfusion-relevant bacteria. Plasma was treated with 1% tri(n-butyl) phosphate and 1% Triton X-45 at 31°C for 90min and then extracted by oil at 31°C for 70min. Decomplemented plasma and Phosphate Buffer Saline were used as controls. Bacterial count was determined in samples taken immediately after spiking, or after S/D and oil treatment. Similar experiments were conducted using three individual recovered plasma donations. Bacteria growth inhibition tests were performed using discs soaked with plasma samples whether containing the S/D agents or not. Results The mean reduction factors of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae due to complement during S/D treatment were >8·75, 4·71, and 4·18 log in pooled plasma and >7·42, 2·24 and >6·08 log in individual plasmas, respectively. Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis were inactivated by S/D (>7·04 and 1·60 log in pooled, and >6·06 and 2·39 in individual plasmas, respectively). Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterobacter cloacae did not multiply during S/D treatment of plasma. Growth inhibition tests revealed an inhibition of three Gram-negative bacteria by complement and all Gram-positive by S/D. Conclusion The S/D treatment of plasma does not alter the bactericidal activity of complement, and inactivates some Gram-positive bacteria.

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KW - Filtration

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KW - Solvent-detergent

KW - Viral inactivation

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